caregiver

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caregiver

 [kār´giv″er]
a lay individual who assumes responsibility for the physical and emotional needs of another who is incapable of self care. See also caregiver role fatigue and caregiver role strain. Called also caretaker.

caregiver

(kâr′gĭv′ər)
n.
1. An individual, such as a physician, nurse, or social worker, who assists in the identification, prevention, or treatment of an illness or disability.
2. An individual, such as a family member or guardian, who takes care of a child or dependent adult.

care′giv′ing adj. & n.

caregiver

one who contributes the benefits of medical, social, economic, or environmental resources to a dependent or partially dependent individual, such as a critically ill person.

caregiver

Health care The person–eg, a family member or a designated HCW–who cares for a Pt with Alzheimer's disease, other form of dementia or chronic debilitating disease requiring provision of nonmedical protective and supportive care

care·giv·er

(kār'giv-ĕr)
1. General term for a physician, nurse, or other health care practitioner who cares for patients.
2. Any person, including a family member, who provides care or assistance to one who is ill.

care·giv·er

(kār'giv-ĕr)
General term for a physician, nurse, other health care practitioner, or family member/friend who cares for patients.

caregiver,

n a person providing treatment or support to a sick, disabled, or dependent individual.

Patient discussion about caregiver

Q. what have been some of the hardest things you've experienced as a parent or caregiver of an autistic child? I would like a point of view of someone with experience so I’ll now what to expect later in life.

A. The hardest thing that I experience as a parent is the ignorance from others who just don't know what autism is, how to handle it, and how rude and dysfunctional they are being towards my child without realizing it, even so called experts like educators and doctors.

More discussions about caregiver
References in periodicals archive ?
Caregiving may cut the time caregivers can devote to paid work.
Middle-aged or older women who provide care for their spouses are six times more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety than women with no caregiving responsibilities.
Since the late 1990s, however, more scientific attention has been paid to the support provider, recognizing the advantages of caregiving and realizing that in terms of mental and physical health, providing support to others can sometimes be more advantageous than receiving it (Schwartz & Sendor, 1999).
Illness--and associated caregiving activities--does not happen within a vacuum.
Their hours are no different than other employees', but their co-workers appear to be picking up on their non-traditional caregiving roles and are treating them disrespectfully," Prof.
The first boomers reached 65 in 2011, and, since women live longer and provide most unpaid care, unpaid caregiving is certainly a women's issue.
The results were surprising, and may be disappointing for those who believe mothers and fathers should share equally in the caregiving for their children, indicates Sarah Sullivan, coauthor of the study.
Clinicians should explore if caregivers are facing financial difficulties, and recommend channels to obtain financial help to reduce the financial burden of caregiving.
The first article explored the relationship between caregiving and overall wellbeing.
With its current narrow scope, for example, marriage fails to support caregiving broadly enough.
While most parents (mothers and fathers) are "born" with innate, hard-wired caregiving traits, readers of this publication, exceptional parents, typically "acquire" them.