cardioselectivity

car·di·o·se·lec·tiv·i·ty

(kar'dē-ō-sĕ-lek-tiv'i-tē),
The relatively predominant cardiovascular pharmacologic effect of a drug with multipharmacologic effects; used especially when describing beta-blocking agents.

cardioselectivity

[-sel′əktiv′itē]
selectivity of a drug, such as a beta-adrenergic agent, for heart tissue over other tissues of the body.

car·di·o·se·lec·tiv·i·ty

(kahr'dē-ō-sĕ-lek-tiv'i-tē)
The relatively predominant cardiovascular pharmacologic effect of a drug with multipharmacologic effects; used especially when describing beta-blocking agents.

cardioselectivity

(kard?e-o-se?lek?tiv'it-e) [ cardio- + L. seligere, to separate, select]
A stronger action on receptors in the heart than on those in the lungs. It is said of beta-adrenergic blocking agents that selectively block beta-1 receptors and thus do not cause bronchospasm.

Patient care

Patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) should avoid high doses of nonselective beta-adrenergic drugs (beta blockers) because they can cause wheezing and shortness of breath. Patients with mild or moderate obstructive lung disease can safely use cardioselective beta blockers.

See: beta-adrenergic blocking agentcardioselective (kard?e-o-se?lek'tiv), adjective
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References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, cardioselectivity is paramount, and therefore metoprolol, bisoprolol and in particular nebivolol should be the first choice treatment.
Cardioselectivity is most pronounced at low doses and is lost at high doses.
The clinical importance of cardioselectivity and lipophilicity in beta blockers.