cardioselective

cardioselective

 [kahr″de-o-sĕ-lek´tiv]
having greater activity on heart tissue than on other tissue.

car·di·o·se·lec·tive

(kar'dē-ō-sĕ-lek'tiv),
Denoting or having the properties of cardioselectivity.

cardioselective

/car·dio·se·lec·tive/ (-sĕ-lek´tiv) having greater activity on heart tissue than on other tissue.

cardioselective

adjective Relating to a therapeutic or other effect that is greater on the heart than on another tissue

car·di·o·se·lec·tive

(kahr'dē-ō-sĕ-lek'tiv)
Denoting or having the properties of cardioselectivity.

cardioselective

having greater activity on heart tissue than on other tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Certain beta blockers can exacerbate airway constriction, so the provider would choose a cardioselective option that targets only beta receptors in the cardiovascular system.
Cardioselective beta-blockers are especially effective at reducing the workload of the heart.
Cardioselective beta-blockers are indicated in the treatment of hypertension and angina pectoris.
The study population included 819 patients on beta-blockers, nearly 90% of which were relatively cardioselective agents such as bisoprolol or atenolol.
Landiolol is an ultra-short acting [bet]-antagonist with a half-life of three minutes that is eight times more cardioselective than esmolol.
Cardioselective and non-cardioselective beta blockers consistently increase the VLDLC level.
The use of cardioselective beta-blockers can improve survival in "carefully selected" patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing vascular surgery, according to a report in the first October issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Researchers regard this as a new finding for carvacrol and suggest that with this evidence and with ongoing research, carvacrol may emerge as a lead molecule with its cardioselective calcium channel blocking properties.
Cardioselective beta blockers at low doses in patients with reactive lung disease who are recovering from myocardial infarction should be considered.
Even hypertension is now controlled by the use of expensive cardioselective medications in lieu of "step therapy" starting with diuretics.
In this setting, cardioselective beta-blockers could be considered, although they should be administered with caution.