cardiofacial syndrome

car·di·o·fa·cial syn·drome

1. transient or persistent unilateral partial lower facial paresis accompanying some congenital heart disease.
2. a group of syndromes characterized by congenital cardiovascular, bone, soft tissue, and facial abnormalities. Examples include Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Noonan syndrome, and Williams syndrome.

Cayler,

Glen G., U.S. physician.
Cayler syndrome - unilateral facial weakness associated with cardiac defects. Synonym(s): cardiofacial syndrome

car·di·o·fa·cial syn·drome

(kahrdē-ō-fāshăl sindrōm)
1. Transient or persistent unilateral partial lower facial paresis accompanying congenital heart disease.
2. Syndromes characterized by congenital cardiovascular, bone, soft tissue, and facial abnormalities.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is now recognized that a 22q11.2 deletion is the cause of several syndromes, including DiGeorge syndrome (de la Chapelle, Herva, Koivisto, & Aula, 1981; DiGeorge, 1965), cardiofacial syndrome (Cayler, 1969; Giannotti, Digilio, Marino, Mingarelli, & Dallapiccola, 1994), conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (Takao syndrome) (Burn et al., 1993; Kinouchi, Mori, Ando, & Takao, 1976; Matsuoka et al., 1994; Takao, Ando, Cho, Kinouchi, & Murakami, 1980), velocardiofacial syndrome (Shprintzen syndrome) (Driscoll et al., 1993; Shprintzen et al., 1978), and cases of autosomal dominant Opitz G/BBB syndrome (McDonald-McGinn et al., 1995; Opitz, Frias, Gutenberger, & Pellet, 1969; Opitz, Summitt, & Smith, 1969).
Cardiofacial syndrome: Congenital heart disease and facial weakness, a hitherto unrecognized association.
DISCUSSION: Asymmetric crying facies (ACF), also called Cayler cardiofacial syndrome, partial unilateral facial paresis and hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris muscle, (3) is a minor congenital anomaly caused by agenesis or hypoplasia of the depressor anguli oris muscle, one of the muscles that control the movements of the lower lip.
When the hypoplasia of the depressor anguli oris muscle is associated with congenital cardiac defects, the term 'Cayler cardiofacial syndrome' is used.
Prevalence of 22q11 microdeletions in DiGeorge and Velo cardiofacial syndrome: implications for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.