cardiac syndrome X

cardiac syndrome X

Ischemic chest pain in patients with normal coronary angiography results but abnormal findings on stress testing or myocardial imaging.

cardiac syndrome X

An informal term for the condition of a patient who suffers chest pain typical of angina but who shows no radiological evidence of coronary artery disease and electrocardiographic changes only on exercise stress testing. Some experts believe that this condition is due to transient narrowing of small coronary artery branches (microvascular spasm).
References in periodicals archive ?
As cardiac syndrome X and angina pectoris caused by typical obstructive coronary heart disease should be distinguished from each other for effective treatment.
There are limited data in literature to compare the MPV in cardiac syndrome X.
The diagnosis of cardiac syndrome X was based on the presence of typical exercise-induced angina pectoris that was associated with transient ischaemic ST segment depression (> 1 mm) during the treadmill exercise testing with normal coronary angiogram in the absence of coronary artery spasm as determined by hyperventilation manoeuvre.
There was a female preponderance in cardiac syndrome X group, but not statistically significant.
Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X have been stated to have multiple pathophysiological abnormalities.
19) Similar to our study, Demirkol et al (20) showed that the MVP values were significantly higher in the Cardiac Syndrome X and coronary artery disease groups than those of the control group.
Another limitation was the possibility of underlying coronary artery spasm in patients with Cardiac Syndrome X, which was excluded using a hyperventilation test, although the ergonovine test would have been the ideal test in this contest.
MPV was significantly higher in patients with either Cardiac Syndrome X or Coronary Artery Disease relative to the control, but with no statistically significant differences were observed between the Cardiac Syndrome X and the CAD groups.
The term Cardiac Syndrome X was first used in 1973 to describe a condition that still to this day remains a bit of a mystery.
Vasomedical (NasdaqSmallCap: VASO) today announced that data demonstrating the efficacy of EECP(R) therapy in treating patients with Cardiac Syndrome X, also known as microvascular angina, were presented at Clinical Research 2003, the National Meeting of the American Federation of Medical Research, in Baltimore, Maryland on March 8, 2003.
Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X experience chest pain typical of angina, but have no significant blockages in their epicardial coronary arteries.
After treatment with EECP, patients with Cardiac Syndrome X refractory to medical therapy showed an average improvement of 2.