cardiac silhouette

cardiac silhouette

The shadow on the chest radiograph created by the heart. A large cardiac silhouette is consistent with cardiac hypertrophy. A narrow silhouette is often seen in patients with emphysema.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cardiac silhouette was invisible, but the radio-opacity of the left lung zone suspected to be the heart was increased.
To establish reference values for cardiac size in the Bonelli's eagle (Aquila fasciata), ventrodorsal radiographs of 20 healthy birds were obtained, and the width of the cardiac silhouette, sternum, thorax, coracoid, and hepatic silhouette were measured.
Thoracic x-ray shows the presence of an enlarged cardiac silhouette with clear lungs and at times is non-specific.
A chest X-ray (CXR) showed an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Initial labs indicated anemia of chronic disease and ESRD but were otherwise unremarkable.
Chest radiography showed an abnormal cardiac silhouette with increased convexity in the lower half of the right cardiac border and cardiomegaly (Figure 1).
Chest X-ray revealed an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography demonstrated ALCAPA, right coronary artery to right ventriclar fistula, right coronary artery aneurysm, collateral coronary circulation formation, severe mitral regurgitation (MR), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 61%, and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) of 33% (Figure 1).
Caption: Figure 1: Chest radiography on admission revealed mild widening of cardiac silhouette and right pleural effusion.
Because of the unexplained elevated white blood cell count and evidence of inflammation, a chest X-ray was performed which revealed normal lung fields but an enlarged cardiac silhouette. X-ray of the cervical spine was normal with no atlantoaxial rotary subluxation demonstrated.
A chest X-ray showed an enlarged cardiac silhouette and mild bilateral pleural effusion (Figure 2).
A chest x-ray is a diagnostic help which can show, in some cases, an enlarged and rounded cardiac silhouette; however, this finding can be limited by the presence of other thoracoabdominal entities.
The cause of brief ECG changes has been mainly attributed to build-up of intrapleural air, which can shift the cardiac silhouette and exert pressure on the heart and coronary vessels precipitating ischemia.
Chest X-ray (Figure 1) was notable for an enlarged cardiac silhouette and moderate right-sided pleural effusion, without evidence of pneumonia.