cardiac dysrhythmia


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Related to cardiac dysrhythmia: atrial fibrillation, ventricular fibrillation

car·di·ac dys·rhyth·mi·a

any abnormality in the rate, regularity, or sequence of cardiac activation.

car·di·ac dys·rhyth·mi·a

(kahr'dē-ak dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Any abnormality in the rate, regularity, or sequence of cardiac activation.

car·di·ac dys·rhyth·mi·a

(kahr'dē-ak dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Any abnormality in the rate, regularity, or sequence of cardiac activation.
References in periodicals archive ?
We confirm previous findings that individuals treated for right-sided renal stones are more likely to develop CD than those treated for left-sided ones.[sup.20,22] Other studies have shown that there is a higher rate of dysrhythmias in patients with renal stones compared with ureteric stones.[sup.13,14] Cardiac dysrhythmias can be induced in an animal model by focusing shockwaves at the apex of the heart.[sup.23] These findings suggest that the location of the stone is an important predisposing factor in the development of CD and this supports the hypothesis that direct pressure stimulation of the myocardium contributes to CD during ESWL.[sup.12]
For example, the chapter on cardiac dysrhythmia gives examples of ECG readings of various anomalies.
In the exposed counties, cRR for heart failure-related ED visits [cRR = 1.37 (95% CI, 1.01-1.85)] during the 3 high-exposure days and 5 subsequent lag days was increased compared with other days, whereas visits for myocardial infarction and cardiac dysrhythmias were not increased for the same time periods in exposed or referent counties.
Cardiac dysrhythmia is a term encompassing various types of irregular heartbeats - from annoying to life threatening.
Given limited data on both these published variables and lack of any comparative studies, we undertook a pilot study to compare FTc, BNP and central venous pressure (CVP) as predictors of fluid responsiveness in septic shock patients without cardiac dysrhythmia. Though its performance as a predictor of fluid responsiveness is questionable (7), CVP was incorporated as a commonly used guide to clinical fluid therapy.
He had heart disease, and the physical exertion caused a "probable cardiac dysrhythmia," the office said, citing the state Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
Of the five patients who had no head trauma, were oriented, had a history of seizures, and were eventually determined to need hospitalization, four had a complicating medical condition, and in all of those cases, the condition--a fracture, cardiac dysrhythmia, infected abscess, delirium tremens--was of the type that would be immediately apparent to a paramedic, Dr.
Of the five patients who had no head trauma, were oriented, had a history of seizures, and were eventually determined to need hospitalization, four had a complicating medical condition, In each of those cases, the condition--a fracture, cardiac dysrhythmia, infected abscess, delirium tremens--was of the type that would be immediately apparent to a paramedic, Dr.
Morato has been "diagnosed with cardiac dysrhythmia, valvular heart disease, aortic stenosis, hypertension and chronic pulmonary disease."
A defibrillator is a medical equipment device that delivers electrical energy with the goal of terminating a cardiac dysrhythmia. There are three basic types of external defibrillators: (a) manual, (b) semi-automatic, and (c) automatic.
The researchers observed a statistically significant, positive association between cardiac dysrhythmia and CO, coarse PM, and EC < 2.5 [micro]m (P[M.sub.2.5] EC), as well as between all cardiovascular diseases and CO, P[M.sub.2.5] EC and OM < 2.5 [micro]m (P[M.sub.2.5] OM).
Suctioning has been associated with potentially serious and life-threatening complications, such as hypoxemia, cardiac dysrhythmia, cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, bronchospasm, increased bronchial mucous production, hypertension, vagal stimulation, increased intracranial pressure (ICP), atelectasis, damage to tracheo-bronchial mucosa, pulmonary hemorrhage, patient anxiety and fear, nosocomial infection, and death (Bostick & Wendelgass; 1987; Bronson, Chatburn, & Covington, 1993; Noll, Hix, & Scott, 1990).