decompensation

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decompensation

 [de″kom-pen-sa´shun]
1. any failure of homeostatic mechanisms.
2. inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation; it is marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, cyanosis, and edema.
3. in psychiatry, the failure of defense mechanisms, which results in progressive personality disintegration.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē'kom-pen-sā'shŭn), Avoid substituting this word for deterioration or failure in cases where there has been no previous compensation.
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

decompensation

(dē′kŏm-pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. Medicine The inability of a bodily organ or system, especially the circulatory system, to maintain adequate physiological function in the presence of disease.
2. Psychology The inability to maintain defense mechanisms in response to stress, resulting in personality disturbance or psychological imbalance.

de·com′pen·sate′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

decompensation

Medtalk An acute exacerbation or worsening of a clinical condition–eg schizophrenia, renal failure, liver failure, which had been held in check by compensatory mechanisms Psychiatry The exacerbation of a mental condition–eg schizophrenia, that occurs when corrective mechanisms cannot maintain the individual at an optimal level of functioning; the deterioration of existing defenses, leading to an exacerbation of pathologic behavior. See Nervous breakdown.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē-kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

decompensation

Failure of an organ to fulfill its function adequately. Examples: corneal decompensation following years of extended contact lens wear; a failure of the eye movement system to overcome a heterophoria.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Early surgical repair has some advantages such as; prevention of cardiac decompensation, decrease of the risk for endocarditis, prevention of excessive adhesions which makes it difficult for reoperations, correction of a simple laceration easily beside repairing a long fistula tract, prevention of outpatient follow-up loss, and prevention of frequent patient follow up for determining the next operation's timing (3, 8).
At the visit after a brief admission for cardiac decompensation, Frank was clearly rattled.
The team caring for a pregnant woman with history of aortic valve replacement or any valvular dysfunction should be prepared for possible maternal cardiac decompensation. Creating a multidisciplinary delivery plan with maternal-fetal medicine, cardiology, anesthesia, and labor and delivery nursing plays a critical role in successful perinatal outcomes.
"End-stage heart disease" commonly refers to an irreversible stage of cardiac decompensation caused by a variety of pathologies that cannot be treated using conventional drugs or traditional surgical treatments.
The increase in cardiac output due to pregnancy and uterine contractions may result into cardiac decompensation which is better avoided under epidural anaesthesia.
Its blood pressure was 160/80 mmHg, heart rate 90/minute, without cardiac decompensation signs, without cardiac murmurs.
Cardiovascular death was defined as follows: (1) Sudden cardiac death (SCD), unexpected sudden collapse occurring within 1 h from the onset of symptoms in patients with a previously stable or uneventful clinical course; (2) Heart failure-related death, occurring in the context of progressive cardiac decompensation ≥1 year before death and proceeded by signs and symptoms of heart failure or cardiogenic shock; (3) Stroke-related death that occurred as a result of probable or proven embolic stroke; (4) Heart transplantation, which was considered equivalent to heart failure-related death; and (5) Aborted cardiac arrest or appropriate discharge of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) for ventricular fibrillation that was regarded as surrogate SCD.
A 76-year-old woman was admitted for cardiac decompensation, hypertension, and renal failure.
At index time, all participants were hospitalized for an episode of cardiac decompensation. To be discharged from the hospital, patients had to be in a recompensated dry state, which is free from volume overload.
SOB/WK may be attributable to various underlying conditions, including cardiac decompensation with or without ACS.
Plasma BNP and N-BNP in particular have shown a close relationship with the degree of cardiac decompensation, hemodynamic and imaging indicators of left ventricular dysfunction, and prognosis in acute coronary syndromes and in heart failure (1-3).