cardenolide


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car·den·o·lide

(kar-den'ō-līd),
A class of cardiac glycosides containing a five-membered lactone ring (for example, the Digitalis glycosides).

cardenolide

one of the two groups of naturally occurring cardiac glycosides; found in plants including Digitalis, Nerium, Thevetia, Cryptostegia, Euonymus, Gomphocarpus, Asclepias, Corchorus, Convallaria, Gerbera, Adonis, Acokanthera spp. Those from Digitalis spp. are used medicinally.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical constituents: Roots, bark and seeds contain cardio-active glycosides, formerly designated as neriodorin, and karabin, pregnanolone, cardenolide glysocide (Prajapati et al.
Periplogenin is a cardenolide isolated from Aegle marmelos, commonly known as Bael in the traditional Indian system of medicine [92].
Milkweed host plant utilization and cardenolide sequestration by monarch butterflies in Louisiana and Texas, p.
Molecular formula of Cerberin: Others: Cerberoside, Cerleaside A, Odollin, Odollotoxin, Thevetin, Cerapain, 17-alpha neriifolin, 17-beta neriifolin, Cardenolide glycoside, Tanghinin, Deacetyl tanghinin.
Digitalis purpurea P5[beta]R2, encoding steroid 5[beta]-reductase, is a novel defense-related gene involved in cardenolide biosynthesis.
Identification of a novel cardenolide (2"-oxovoruscharin) from Calotropis procera and the hemisynthesis of novel derivatives displaying potent in vitro antitumor activities and high in vivo tolerance: structure-activity relationship analyses.
Entire plant Cardiac glycosides (Apocynaceae) of the cardenolide type.
The cardenolide glycosides of the drug are qualitatively digitoxin-like in their action, but generally weaker, probably due to the lower rate of absorption.
While some plant families responded to elevated carbon dioxide by increasing cardenolide production, most decreased production by as much as 50 percent.
Evolutionary and ecological implications of cardenolide sequestration in the monarch butterfly.
1991, "A cardenolide tetraglyoside from Oxystelma esculentum, " Phytochemistry, 30, pp.