carding

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card·ing

(kard'ing),
The procedure of placing individual sets of anterior or posterior teeth in trays lined with a wax strip.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

card·ing

(kahrding)
Procedure of placing individual sets of anterior or posterior teeth in trays lined with a wax strip.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
The seven he needed was lying uppermost, the first card in the pack.
"I think that I shall hunt up some others who may be equally bored, and see if we cannot find enough for a game of cards."
"I still got the hunch." Kearns fingered his cards a long time.
Barsad saw losing cards in it that Sydney Carton knew nothing of.
I pointed to his card. "And you apply to me," I rejoined, "at Mr.
The speakers whom they had heard were two men, who had a pack of cards and some silver money between them, while upon the screen itself the games they had played were scored in chalk.
The card, the fatal card, was gone from the pages of Ruskin, and he guessed what had happened.
Sarah recognised the first card she had typewritten that afternoon.
As the trump card was turned up, at the commencement of the second deal, two young ladies hurried into the room, and took their stations on either side of Mrs.
As soon as his back was turned Lady Janet lifted the gold pencil-case which hung at her watch-chain, and wrote on her nephew's card (for the information of the officer in plain clothes), " You are wanted at Mablethorpe House ." This done, she put the card into the old-fashioned pocket of her dress, and returned to the dining-room.
But Alan and Cluny were most of the time at the cards, and I am clear that Alan must have begun by winning; for I remember sitting up, and seeing them hard at it, and a great glittering pile of as much as sixty or a hundred guineas on the table.
Now, our friend the Colonel had a great aptitude for all games of chance: and exercising himself, as he continually did, with the cards, the dice- box, or the cue, it is natural to suppose that he attained a much greater skill in the use of these articles than men can possess who only occasionally handle them.