carcinostatic


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car·ci·no·stat·ic

(kar'si-nō-stat'ik),
1. Pertaining to an arresting or inhibitory effect on the development or progression of a carcinoma.
2. An agent that manifests such an effect.

carcinostatic

adjective That which slows the growth of a carcinoma.

car·ci·no·stat·ic

(kahr'si-nō-stat'ik)
Agent with an arresting or inhibitory effect on the development or progression of a carcinoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
The carcinostatic and proapoptotic potential of 4-hydroxynonenal in HeLa cells is associated with its conjugation to cellular proteins.
Methioninase and selenomethionine but not Se-methylselenocysteine generate methylselenol and superoxide in an in vitro chemiluminescent assay: implications for the nutritional carcinostatic activity of selenoamino acids.
In Chinese medicine, dried mushrooms are used as diuretics and some other species have recently been getting attention as carcinostatic substances (Mizuno 1995; Wasser and Weis 1999).
Sugars are different from the commonly used chemotherapy agents, and their carcinostatic effects seem to be based on the stimulation of the immune system.
Propolis is a resinous material elaborated by honey bees (Apis mellifera) well known for its medical effects, including antinflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory and carcinostatic activities (Dobrovoiski et al., 1991).
Work has been done on the transinfluence in Pt(II) chemistry, and there is an interest in the molecular mechanism of carcinostatic drugs which are coordination compounds, with particular emphasis on the field of Pt(II) chemistry centred around cis-(Pt2Cl2(NH3)2) and the Cu(II) thiosemicarbazone area.
Ganoderma lucidum (GL) is a traditional Chinese medicine known to contribute to various biological and medicinal functions including hypoglycemic, antitumour, carcinostatic, antimutagenic, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antiandrogenic, and antiviral properties [1-6].