carcinogenicity


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Related to carcinogenicity: mutagenicity, genotoxicity

carcinogenicity

 [kahr″sĭ-no-jĕ-nis´ĭ-te]
the ability or tendency to produce cancer; see also carcinogen.

car·ci·no·gen·i·ci·ty

(kar'sin-ō-jen-is'ĭ-tē),
Ability to cause cancer.

carcinogenicity

/car·ci·no·ge·nic·i·ty/ (kahr″sĭ-no-jĕ-nis´ĭ-te) the ability or tendency to produce cancer.

car·ci·no·gen·i·ci·ty

(kahr'sin-ō-jĕn-is'i-tē)
Ability to cause cancer.

carcinogenicity

the ability or tendency to produce cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The central aim of the methodology proposed in the Integrated Long-Term Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Study is to maximize the breadth of outcomes assessed and to increase the sensitivity of testing beyond that in commonly used protocols to give more reliable and inclusive information on many important end points (Figure 1).
The carcinogenicity of mate was also previously evaluated in 1991, when hot mate drinking was classified as 'probably carcinogenic to humans'.
Ghaemi said he gave no consideration to carcinogenicity of antidepressants, even when prescribing to patients with a history of cancer.
Carcinogenicity and cardiomyopathy could prove to be serious long-term effects of statin therapy.
While recognising that only the carcinogenicity of these two wood dusts has thus far been scientifically confirmed, the Parliamentary report by Quinidio Correia (PES, Portugal) points to the precautionary principle in emphasising that wood dust from all types of hardwood are most probably a cause of cancer.
First, the good news: Despite IARC's classification, the agency's report says a summary of epidemiological research "suggested there is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity in humans of carbon black.
Ritalin has been sold for 40 years, but it came on the market before drug makers were required to test for carcinogenicity.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) memorandum charges that an EPA investigation into allegations that Monsanto falsified scientific studies on the carcinogenicity of dioxin was itself fraudulent.
One of his most valuable chapters deals with how substances are tested for carcinogenicity.
The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that there is sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity of crystalline silica to experimental animals and limited evidence for the carcinogenicity of crystalline silica to humans.
An interesting chapter in the book on cyclopenta[a]phenanthrenes attempts to relate the x-ray crystallographic data on molecular strain to carcinogenicity.
Hamburg's dismissal of standard carcinogenicity tests is bizarre.