carcinogen


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carcinogen

 [kahr-sin´o-jen]
a substance that causes cancer. The Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S. Government has three descriptors for classifying human carcinogenic potential: “known/likely,” “cannot be determined,” and “not likely.”

car·cin·o·gen

(kar-sin'ō-jen, kar'si-nō-jen),
Any cancer-producing substance or organism, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or agents such as in certain types of irradiation.
[carcino- + G, -gen, producing]

carcinogen

/car·cin·o·gen/ (kahr-sin´ah-jen) any substance which causes cancer.carcinogen´ic
epigenetic carcinogen  one that does not itself damage DNA but causes alterations that predispose to cancer.
genotoxic carcinogen  one that reacts directly with DNA or with macromolecules that then react with DNA.

carcinogen

(kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kär′sə-nə-jĕn′)
n.
A cancer-causing substance or agent.

car′ci·no·gen′e·sis (kär′sə-nə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs) n.
car′cin·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
car′ci·no·ge·nic′i·ty (-jə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

carcinogen

[kärsin′əjin]
Etymology: Gk, karkinos + genein, to produce
a substance or agent that causes the development or increases the incidence of cancer. The United States Department of Health and Human Services publishes a biennial report that contains a list of all substances which either are known to be human carcinogens or may reasonably be anticipated to be human carcinogens. carcinogenic, adj.

carcinogen

Oncology Any physical or chemical agent or substance which, when administered by an appropriate route, ↑ incidence of tumors when compared to unexposed control population. See Cocarcinogen, Complete carcinogen, Natural carcinogen, Proximal carcinogen.

car·cin·o·gen

(kahr-sin'ŏ-jen)
Any cancer-producing substance or organism, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or agents such as certain types of irradiation.
[carcino- + G, -gen, producing]

carcinogen

Any CANCER-producing agency.

carcinogen

a substance which is a CANCER-causing agent.

Carcinogen

A substance that is known to cause cancer.
Mentioned in: Eye Cancer

carcinogen

any cancer-inducing substance

carcinogen (kär·sinˑ··jin),

n any agent found to be cancer-causing.

car·cin·o·gen

(kahr-sin'ŏ-jen)
Any cancer-producing substance or organism.
[carcino- + G, -gen, producing]

carcinogen (kärsin´əjen),

n a substance or agent that causes the development or increases the incidence of cancer.

carcinogen

a substance that causes cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on that draft, it appears that the SAB agreed that human fetuses and children are uniquely sensitive to carcinogens and applauded the EPA's efforts to consider children as a distinct subset of the population.
Cobalt and cobalt compounds that release cobalt ions in vivo are being listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen.
The study measured the levels of carcinogens at 20 apartment homes in the Hamra area over an extended period.
have unacceptably high levels of this particular carcinogen," explained Hecht.
For example, once a substance is included in the Report on Carcinogens, its listing must be noted on material safety data sheets, which are posted at workplaces.
gov/go/roc12) 12th Report on Carcinogens now includes 240 listings.
Exposure in the womb may be the first hit, and subsequent exposure later in life to a second carcinogen may activate cancer.
6], which would define risk from any carcinogen and source of exposure so trivial that regulatory action to reduce risk would be unwarranted; and 3) for lifetime risk above de minimis levels, reduction of risks based on the application of the as low as reasonably achievable principle.
Fighting to keep a substance as a suspected carcinogen appears to be a strange thing for an association to be doing, but the Polyurethane Manufacturers Association is doing just that.
This compound is the first example of a potential organic carcinogen isolated from tobacco.
Washington, Jan 13 (ANI): In a new study, chlorophyll in green vegetables was found to offer protection against cancer when tested against the modest carcinogen exposure levels most likely to be found in the environment, but it actually increases the number of tumours at very high carcinogen exposure levels.
Chang found that there is no "known" evidence that styrene is a carcinogen.