carboxyhemoglobin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to carboxyhemoglobin: methemoglobin, carbon monoxide poisoning, carboxyhemoglobin test

carboxyhemoglobin

 [kahr-bok″se-he´mo-glo″bin]
hemoglobin in which the sites usually bound to oxygen are bound to carbon monoxide molecules; carbon monoxide has an affinity for hemoglobin over 200 times that of oxygen. See carbon monoxide poisoning.

car·box·y·he·mo·glo·bin (HbCO),

(kar-bok'sē-hē'mō-glō'bin),
A fairly stable union of carbon monoxide with hemoglobin. The formation of carboxyhemoglobin prevents the normal transfer of carbon dioxide and oxygen during the circulation of blood; thus, increasing levels of carboxyhemoglobin result in various degrees of asphyxiation, including death.

carboxyhemoglobin

/car·boxy·he·mo·glo·bin/ (-he´mo-glo″bin) hemoglobin combined with carbon monoxide, which occupies the sites on the hemoglobin molecule that normally bind with oxygen and which is not readily displaced from the molecule.

carboxyhemoglobin

(kär-bŏk′sē-hē′mə-glō′bĭn)
n.
The compound that is formed when inhaled carbon monoxide combines with hemoglobin, binding more tightly than oxygen and rendering the hemoglobin incapable of transporting oxygen.

carboxyhemoglobin

[kärbok′sēhē′məglō′bin, -hem′-]
Etymology: L, carbo + Gk, oxys, sharp, haima, blood; L, globus, ball
a hemoglobin variant produced by the exposure of hemoglobin to carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide from the environment is inhaled into the lungs, absorbed through the alveoli, and bound to hemoglobin in the blood, blocking the sites for oxygen transport. Oxygen levels decrease, and hypoxia and anoxia may result. Also spelled carboxyhaemoglobin. See also carbon monoxide poisoning, oxyhemoglobin.

carboxyhemoglobin

Haemoglobin (Hb) with irreversibly bound carbon monoxide (COHb). COHb levels reflect CO exposure, which increases in fires and with exposure to car exhaust; Some COHb occurs naturally as a product of Hb catabolism and due to increased turnover of Hb in newborns, coupled with reduced efficiency of the infant’s respiratory system, leading to increased COHb.

Carboxyhaemoglobin levels
• < 2%: Non-smokers;
• 2%–12%: Smokers;
• > 20%: Toxic;
• > 50%: Lethal.

carboxyhemoglobin

COHb Hb in which carbon monoxide–CO is irreversibly bound

car·box·y·he·mo·glo·bin

(kahr-bok'sē-hē'mŏ-glō'bin)
A stable union of carbon monoxide with hemoglobin. The formation of carboxyhemoglobin prevents the normal transfer of carbon dioxide and oxygen during the circulation of blood; thus, increasing levels of carboxyhemoglobin result in various degrees of asphyxiation, including death.
Synonym(s): carbon monoxide hemoglobin, carboxyhaemoglobin.

Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb)

Hemoglobin that is bound to carbon monoxide instead of oxygen.

carboxyhemoglobin

hemoglobin combined with carbon monoxide, which occupies the sites on the hemoglobin molecule that normally bind with oxygen and which is not readily displaced from the molecule; exposure to carbon monoxide thus results in cellular anoxia. See also hemoglobin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors of this case study show evidence of comparability of results for a CO-oximeter and manual spectrophotometric method and cite studies comparing results for postmortem blood carboxyhemoglobin measured by CO-oximetry and gas chromatography.
Effects of carboxyhemoglobin on two portable hemoglobinometers.
In 2005, Masimo introduced rainbow SET Pulse CO-Oximetry (TM) technology, allowing noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood constituents that previously required invasive procedures, including total hemoglobin (SpHb), oxygen content (SpOC (TM)), carboxyhemoglobin (SpCO), methemoglobin (SpMet), and Pleth Variability Index (PVI), in addition to SpO2, pulse rate, and perfusion index (PI).
3) Because symptoms of CO poisoning are nonspecific - ranging from mild headache, nausea, confusion, and dizziness to end-organ injury, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and death - diagnosis is difficult and has historically relied on clinical suspicion and confirmation by measurement of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) via invasive blood-gas analysis.
In 2005, Masimo introduced rainbow SET Pulse CO-Oximetry (TM) technology, allowing noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood constituents that previously required invasive procedures, including total hemoglobin (SpHb), oxygen content (SpOCTM), carboxyhemoglobin (SpCO), methemoglobin (SpMet), and Pleth Variability Index (PVI), in addition to SpO2, pulse rate, and perfusion index (PI).
June 21, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Masimo(NASDAQ: MASI) announced today a new study in The American Journal of Emergency Medicine demonstrates for the first time that compared to invasive carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) measurement with laboratory CO-oximetry, noninvasive carboxyhemoglobin (SpCO) measurement with Masimo rainbow Pulse CO-Oximetry (TM) leads to more rapid diagnosis of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and a shorter time to the initiation of treatment with hyperbaric oxygen.
In 2005, Masimo introduced rainbow SETA Pulse CO-Oximetry technology, allowing noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood constituents that previously required invasive procedures, including total hemoglobin (SpHbA), oxygen content (SpOCTM), carboxyhemoglobin (SpCOA), methemoglobin (SpMetA), and Pleth Variability Index (PVIA), in addition to SpO2, pulse rate, and perfusion index (PI).
In addition to SpO (2), pulse rate, and perfusion index (PI), Masimo rainbow SET measures total hemoglobin (SpHb), oxygen content (SpOC (TM)), carboxyhemoglobin (SpCO), methemoglobin (SpMet), and Pleth Variability Index (PVI).
The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level may be related to the changes of QT, corrected QT (QTc), QT dispersion (QTd), corrected Qtd (QTdc) and cardiac enzymes during carbon monoxide poisoning.
In all pulmonary function laboratories, the predicted DLCO should be corrected for the patient's true hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin values.
Blood carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) concentrations are used to confirm the diagnosis of CO poisoning, although these concentrations are not always well correlated with clinical manifestation or outcome.
The orders call for immediate administration of 100% high-flow oxygen (to be continued for at least 4 hours in patients with exposure) and for the use of venous blood gas sampling to determine carboxyhemoglobin values, even in asymptomatic patients.