carbonize

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carbonize

(kăr′bŏn-īz)
To char or convert into charcoal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although the data in table 2, it can be observed that the lower results of primary root length and shoot were obtained using the powder substrate of wood and carbonized rice straw.
In comparison to other reported manganese oxides in lithium-ion batteries, the carbonized fungal biomass-mineral composite "showed an excellent cycling stability and more than 90% capacity was retained after 200 cycles," he says.
At low pH, adsorption of carbonized tendu leaf refuse get promoted and the active sites of adsorbent for binding of metals becomes less available, thus the metal removal efficiency decreases.
17) The fibers were successfully carbonized and characterized.
The company stated the new patent provides a significant reduction of the petroleum component by substituting it with carbonized soybean oil in its green polyurethane product, while maintaining and improving all of the favorable product characteristics.
It took him one and a half years of work, but he succeeded in creating an incandescent lamp with a filament of carbonized sewing thread that burned for 13V2 hours.
In Japan, charcoal businesses focusing on agricultural uses for charcoal were expected to grow significantly after scientific studies were performed in the 1980s by the Technical Research Association for Multiuse of Carbonized Materials and others, but the market has stagnated since the mid-1990s.
Meanwhile, scientists at the University of Delaware report that carbonized chicken feather fibers may be an ideal hydrogen storage substance.
Made of carbonized bamboo and food-grade melamine bowls, the Bowlboard was created by Melbourne-based designer Kaln Lucas, designsabroad.
Washington, September 18 (ANI): New findings in the form of carbonized rice have indicated that farming in the Yangtze Basin in China existed as early as 4,000 years ago.
Researchers in Delaware said they've developed a new hydrogen storage method based on carbonized chicken-feather fibers.