carbonize

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Related to carbonization: gasification

carbonize

(kăr′bŏn-īz)
To char or convert into charcoal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Impurity levels in the solution (MCR) is one of the several factors that govern the tensile strength of carbon fibers, other factors being precursor fiber properties, strains in stabilization and carbonization, time and temperature of stabilization and carbonization.
Several methods, such as chemical vapor deposition [4], carbonization of polymer [5-7] and pressure carbonization [8, 9], have been widely used to synthesize carbon materials.
The results indicated that adsorption capacity of the adsorbent was influenced by solution pH, initial metal ion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage, particle sizes, carbonization temperature and solution temperatures.
Table 5 shows the weight and volume changes of MG during the process of carbonization and HTP.
In Figure 8, it can be seen that the microhardness of the LG-XJ interface increases and that the width of the ITZ decreases after 28 days carbonization; thus, the interface of low-strength-grade recycled concrete is affected by carbonization.
According to the study by Mo and Panesar [14], after 56 days of carbonization, the strength of the 40% magnesium oxide test piece is close to that of the 20% magnesium oxide test piece so that three different proportions (mass ratio) are used; MgO in the curing agent doping are 15%, 25%, and 35%.
During the hydrothermal carbonization, we investigated the effects of the reaction temperature, the reaction time, and the mass ratio of S.
The variables to be measured were the depth and width of the incisions, the carbonization area, and the necrotic area.
Carbonization was performed in a furnace CTF 12/TZF 12 (Carbolite Gero Ltd., Hope, UK), approaching a temperature of 800[degrees]C with a heating rate of 10[degrees]C/min in a nitrogen flow of 150 mL/min (STP), followed by isothermal treatment for 1 h.
The carbonization was performed in a tubular electrical furnace.
Due to the availability, cheap cost, and ability to become highly porous after carbonization, different kinds of biomass feedstock have been used as precursors for carbon.
This was then followed by heating at a rate of 5[degrees]C per minute up to 600[degrees]C in a nitrogen environment to bring about carbonization of the polymer fibres and calcination of Ti[O.sub.2] particles.