carbonate

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carbonate

 [kahr´bon-āt]
a salt of carbonic acid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·bon·ate

(kar'bŏn-āt),
1. A salt of carbonic acid.
2. The ion CO32-.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

car·bon·ate

(kahr'bŏn-āt)
1. A salt of carbonic acid.
2. The ion CO32-.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

car·bon·ate

(kahr'bŏn-āt)
A salt of carbonic acid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about carbonate

Q. hi my name is ray i am from england and i am on oxygen i am a retainer of carbon monxide do you guys know whoa any place working with stem cell or natural medical emial rsantolla@aol.co.uk

A. i had a whole course on stem cell use in tissue engineering and from what i know this is an area that still in research and very little clinical use. the ability to create lungs from Mesenchimal Stem Cells is a far away dream right now. but here are some links to labs that research that area:
http://organizedwisdom.com/Stem_Cells_for_Emphysema

More discussions about carbonate
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the mechanical strength as a function of carbonation, the proposed correlation coefficients give a good correlation for the two media ([R.sup.2] = 0.9274, [R.sup.2] = 0.9889) with the experimental values; this correlation measurement of the resistance makes it possible to estimate the durability regarding the carbonation.
This work aims to quantify the effects of wet cure duration on the different chemical and mechanical properties of one-year-old mortars and cement pastes mainly and the durability regarding natural carbonation and compressive strength as studied characteristics.
(iii) The carbonation depth is greater for the CEMII/BS and CEMII/BP test specimens compared to CEMI52.5 and CEMII42.5; this effect is in part attributed to the low clinker content and therefore the content of portlandite Ca[(OH).sub.2] and the pozzolanic activity.
(iv) The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is the most optimized method for investigating natural carbonation in mortars and cement pastes.
(vii) The cement hydration is delayed by the pozzolanic activity of the addition, which is explained by the greater carbonation depth and a lower portlandite content.
(viii) A good correlation exists between compressive strength and natural carbonation. An almost linear relationship has been observed between different mortars and resistance increases when carbonation decreases.
(ix) Portlandite content is increasing as a function of the compressive strength and the inversely is decreasing in regard to the natural carbonation.
(xii) The correlation between portlandite content, compressive strength, and natural carbonation was satisfactorily performed; the portlandite content seemed to be an important parameter in the prediction of the resistance of mortars and their durability.
Richardson, "The carbonation of hardened cement pastes," Advances in Cement Research, vol.
Chaussadent, "Comparison and validity of methods for measuring the carbonation," French Journal of Civil Engineering, vol.
Miragliotta, Modeling physicochemical process of carbonation prefabricated concrete consideration of wall effects [Ph.D.