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carbon

 (C) [kahr´bon]
a chemical element, atomic number 6, atomic weight 12.011. (See Appendix 6.)
carbon 11 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 11, having a half-life of 20.39 minutes; used as a tracer in positron emission tomography.
carbon 14 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 14, having a half-life of 5730 years; used as a tracer in cancer and metabolic research.

car·bon (C),

(kar'bŏn),
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in three pure forms (diamond, graphite, and in the fullerines), in amorphous form (in charcoal, coke, and soot), and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

(kär′bən)
n.
1. Symbol C An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
2. A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect: plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.
3.
a. A sheet of carbon paper.
b. A carbon copy.
4. Electricity
a. Either of two rods through which current flows to form an arc, as in lighting or welding.
b. A carbonaceous electrode in an electric cell.

car′bon·ous (-bə-nəs) adj.

carbon

Chemistry
A nonmetallic tetravalent element (atomic number, 6; atomic weight, 12.01), which is central to all forms of life, and a core constituent of organic molecules.
 
Materials science
Because of its chemical properties, carbon has potential for use with silicon as a low-activation structural material for fusion reactors, as silicon carbide.

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in diamond, graphite, charcoal, coke, and soot, and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

The non-metallic element on which all organic chemistry is based and which is thus present in all organic matter. A carbon atom is capable of combining with up to four other atoms (tetravalent), including other carbon atoms; it is this property that allows so many compounds to be formed.

carbon

the element which is the basis of organic structure. Carbon has a valency of four, each atom forming four covalent bonds in its compounds. Long chains may be formed which give rise to the complexity of many organic compounds.

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
Nonmetallic tetravalent element found in all living tissues; the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

Patient discussion about carbon

Q. hi my name is ray i am from england and i am on oxygen i am a retainer of carbon monxide do you guys know whoa any place working with stem cell or natural medical emial rsantolla@aol.co.uk

A. i had a whole course on stem cell use in tissue engineering and from what i know this is an area that still in research and very little clinical use. the ability to create lungs from Mesenchimal Stem Cells is a far away dream right now. but here are some links to labs that research that area:
http://organizedwisdom.com/Stem_Cells_for_Emphysema

More discussions about carbon
References in periodicals archive ?
A few years later, Wedgwood realised this carbon paper could be developed for making copies of private or business letters and other documents.
In addition, it will provide good reading for anyone who is simply interested in old-fashioned ways of doing things: make carbon paper, waxed paper, soap, mock marble, candles, and hundreds of other items.
And now you are translating it into your native tongue, transcribing it word for glorious word onto layers of onionskin and carbon paper, making a few copies for a few trusted friends who, like you, will risk anything to read Solzhenitsyn's forbidden work and will risk again to pass it on.
What's more, carbon paper was good for your mental health.
For each pillow, buy a 20-inch-square pillow form and two 21-inch squares of cotton duck (preshrink); also carbon paper, pencils, black fabric markers, fabric paints, paintbrushes, newspaper, paper plates, and butcher paper.
According to the Royal Oman Police's customs department, the suspect tried to hide the illegal narcotics by covering them with carbon paper. In a statement online, Oman Customs said, "Muscat International Airport customs arrested an Asian national with 8.7 kg of marijuana and 1,285 drug tablets hidden within the defendant's personal baggage and covered by carbon paper."
Twenty big plastic sachets of shabu, hidden in the soles of 10 pairs of assorted slippers and sandals and covered with carbon paper, were confiscated from Justo's Isuzu D-Max pick-up truck, which he used in delivering shabu, Ledesma said.
1806: The first carbon paper was patented by Ralph Wedgewood.
revolution (A Revolution for Each Stencil), 2007, a wall covered with sheets of carbon paper (the same installation was exhibited at Tate Modern last fall).
A SPANISH man tried to smuggle pounds 500,000 worth of cocaine into Northern Ireland by wrapping it in carbon paper to fool X-ray equipment.
His 40 years in Holmfirth touched on the wide range of his work, beginning with the early days using manual typewriters with carbon paper copies on which all the legal material was recorded.