carbon monoxide


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Related to carbon monoxide: carbon monoxide poisoning

carbon monoxide

 
a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas, CO, formed by burning carbon or organic fuels with a scanty supply of oxygen; it is the number one cause of unintentional poisoning around the world (see carbon monoxide poisoning). Inhalation causes central nervous system damage and asphyxiation. Carbon monoxide is present in the exhaust of gasoline engines, in the smoke of wood and coal fires, in manufactured gas such as that used in the household, and wherever carbon burns without a sufficient supply of oxygen.
carbon monoxide poisoning poisoning by carbon monoxide, the most common type of gas poisoning around the world. When the gas is inhaled and comes in contact with the blood, it combines more readily with hemoglobin than oxygen does. Thus it takes the place of oxygen in the erythrocytes, and the tissues are deprived of their normal oxygen supply. The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning begin with dizziness, headache, weakness, shortness of breath, and sometimes nausea; the skin and mucous membranes become cherry red in color. Unconsciousness follows, with death from asphyxia if a large enough quantity is inhaled.
Treatment. The victim of acute carbon monoxide poisoning should be moved immediately to an open area with fresh air. Administration of 100 per cent oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen via face mask may be indicated.
Prevention. Cases of carbon monoxide poisoning are usually accidental. It should be remembered that carbon monoxide has no odor and its presence may not be detected unless other gases, such as exhaust fumes from an automobile motor, are also escaping. Care should be taken to ensure proper ventilation of working and sleeping areas. It is extremely dangerous to leave an automobile motor running in a closed garage. Stoves and furnaces should be kept in good repair. Burners using gas, especially in a bedroom, should have a ventilator pipe to carry the exhaust to the outside.

car·bon mon·ox·ide (CO),

a colorless, practically odorless, and poisonous gas formed by the incomplete combustion of carbon; its toxic action is due to its stronger affinity for hemoglobin, myoglobin, and the cytochromes than oxygen, thereby reducing oxygen transport, tissue delivery, and use.

carbon monoxide (CO)

Etymology: L, carbo + Gk, monos, single, oxys, sharp
a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas produced by the combustion of carbon or organic fuels in a limited oxygen supply, as in the cylinders of an internal combustion engine or an improperly set oil or gas furnace. CO combines irreversibly with hemoglobin, preventing the formation of oxyhemoglobin and reducing the oxygen supply to the tissues. Prolonged exposure to high levels of CO results in asphyxiation.

carbon monoxide

CO Clinical toxicology A byproduct of combustion, which is a tasteless, odorless gas that outcompetes O2 for Hb binding–CO has a 200-fold > affinity for active heme sites than O2 Clinical-early Headache, nausea Clinical-late Coma, cardiovascular collapse Clinical-too late Death

car·bon mon·ox·ide

(CO) (kahr'bŏn mŏ-noks'īd)
A colorless, practically odorless, poisonous gas formed by the incomplete combustion of carbon; its toxic action is due to its strong affinity for hemoglobin, myoglobin, and the cytochromes, reducing oxygen transport and blocking oxygen use.

carbon monoxide

A simple, but poisonous, compound consisting of an atom of carbon linked to an atom of oxygen (CO). It is formed when carbon is oxidized in conditions of limited oxygen, as in the internal combustion engine.

carbon monoxide

a colourless, odourless gas formed by the incomplete oxidation of carbon; it is poisonous to animals (see CARBOXYHAEMOGLOBIN). Formula: CO.

Carbon monoxide

A colorless, odorless, highly poisonous gas.
Mentioned in: Antiparkinson Drugs

car·bon mon·ox·ide

(CO) (kahr'bŏn mŏ-noks'īd)
Colorless, practically odorless, and poisonous gas formed by the incomplete combustion of carbon.

carbon monoxide

a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas, CO, formed by burning carbon or organic fuels with a scanty supply of oxygen; inhalation causes central nervous system damage and asphyxiation. Carbon monoxide is present in the exhaust of petrol engines, in the smoke of wood and coal fires, in manufactured gas such as that used in the household, and wherever carbon burns without a sufficient supply of oxygen. Used as a euthanizing agent for dogs and laboratory animals.

carbon monoxide poisoning
poisoning by carbon monoxide; one of the most common types of gas poisoning. When carbon monoxide is inhaled, it comes in contact with the blood and combines with hemoglobin. Since carbon monoxide combines more readily with hemoglobin than does oxygen, it takes the place of oxygen in the erythrocytes, and the tissues are thus deprived of their normal oxygen supply. Death from asphyxia results if a large enough quantity of carbon monoxide is inhaled. Because death is very sudden, carbon monoxide has been used as a euthanatizing agent for dogs in large numbers. It is not widely used because of the danger to human attendants and the difficulty in maintaining a CO generator in good condition for long periods.
References in periodicals archive ?
com/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-kills-4-new-york-city-house-after-car-was-left-running-1878304) Car Left Running In Garage Leads To 4 Deaths In New York City From Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Police said the tail pipe of the vehicle was covered with mud, filling the vehicle with carbon monoxide.
Dr Simon Bouffler of Public Health England's Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards (CRCE), says: "Many carbon monoxide poisoning deaths are preventable.
LYNN GRIFFITHS, founder and president of the charity Carbon Monoxide Awareness
But the campaign group fears the real number of homeowners with a carbon monoxide alarm is much lower.
The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are hard to spot as they are very similar to common illnesses like colds or flu and the gas can strike very quickly.
According to the Department of Health, 50 people died from carbon monoxide poisoning last year and 4,000 were treated in hospital.
But a new law that requires rental property managers, real estate agents and homeowners looking to sell or rent their homes to install carbon monoxide alarms in homes - passed by the state Legislature last year - goes into effect July 1.
This week is Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week, and energy supplier Scottish Hydro Electric is asking people to make sure their boilers are serviced, and that chimneys and flues are free from blockages.
CARBON monoxide - the so-called "silent killer" - has been responsible for the deaths of 42 Britons and the poisoning of a further 177 in the past year, according to figures by gas safety watchdog CORGI.
WASHINGTON -- On the heels of a high-profile congressional hearing on the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) role with the nation's food supply, two members of Congress introduced legislation that would require that meat treated with carbon monoxide (CO) be labeled as such.