carbon

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carbon

 (C) [kahr´bon]
a chemical element, atomic number 6, atomic weight 12.011. (See Appendix 6.)
carbon 11 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 11, having a half-life of 20.39 minutes; used as a tracer in positron emission tomography.
carbon 14 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 14, having a half-life of 5730 years; used as a tracer in cancer and metabolic research.

car·bon (C),

(kar'bŏn),
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in three pure forms (diamond, graphite, and in the fullerines), in amorphous form (in charcoal, coke, and soot), and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

(kär′bən)
n.
1. Symbol C An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
2. A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect: plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.
3.
a. A sheet of carbon paper.
b. A carbon copy.
4. Electricity
a. Either of two rods through which current flows to form an arc, as in lighting or welding.
b. A carbonaceous electrode in an electric cell.

car′bon·ous (-bə-nəs) adj.

carbon

Chemistry
A nonmetallic tetravalent element (atomic number, 6; atomic weight, 12.01), which is central to all forms of life, and a core constituent of organic molecules.
 
Materials science
Because of its chemical properties, carbon has potential for use with silicon as a low-activation structural material for fusion reactors, as silicon carbide.

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in diamond, graphite, charcoal, coke, and soot, and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

The non-metallic element on which all organic chemistry is based and which is thus present in all organic matter. A carbon atom is capable of combining with up to four other atoms (tetravalent), including other carbon atoms; it is this property that allows so many compounds to be formed.

carbon

the element which is the basis of organic structure. Carbon has a valency of four, each atom forming four covalent bonds in its compounds. Long chains may be formed which give rise to the complexity of many organic compounds.

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
Nonmetallic tetravalent element found in all living tissues; the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

Patient discussion about carbon

Q. hi my name is ray i am from england and i am on oxygen i am a retainer of carbon monxide do you guys know whoa any place working with stem cell or natural medical emial rsantolla@aol.co.uk

A. i had a whole course on stem cell use in tissue engineering and from what i know this is an area that still in research and very little clinical use. the ability to create lungs from Mesenchimal Stem Cells is a far away dream right now. but here are some links to labs that research that area:
http://organizedwisdom.com/Stem_Cells_for_Emphysema

More discussions about carbon
References in periodicals archive ?
Cooled liquefied wood was then filtrated, and filter liquor was kept in glass container until it was used for carbon fiber production.
Both the carbon fiber production plant and the SPADC capabilities are aligned with Saudi Arabia's National Industrial Clusters Development Program to grow and diversify the manufacturing sector in Saudi Arabia.
Through patented technology, carbon fiber rotor cavities are molded to the exact shape of tubes and labware, providing superior support.
And fuel batteries, the favorite for clean energy technology, use Carbon Fiber material at their heart parts.
Within the recycled carbon fiber market, transportation will remain the largest end-use industry and it is also expected to witness the highest growth over the forecast period due to increasing demand for lightweight, cost-effective materials.
Park, XPS Analysis of Carbon Fiber Surfaces-Anodized and Interfacial Effects in Fiber-Epoxy Composites, Journal of Colloid and Interface Sceinces, 215, 167-169 (1999).
In 2013, Pourghannad, Shokri, and Faridmanesh again tried to export carbon fiber. Faridmanesh specifically instructed an unnamed intermediary to change the shipping labels to reference "acrylic" or "polyester," rather than "carbon fiber, the Justice Department said.
We further show the correlation between inhomogeneity in PAN solution detected using DLS with the tensile strength of carbon fibers. Finally, we demonstrate for the first time a surfactant assisted purification method using Triton X-100 and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate, to remove contaminants in PAN powder, and to reduce inhomogeneity in the spinning dope.
Carbon fiber is an amazing material that can be used in many industries and products, ranging from golf shafts to airplanes and space satellites.
Although the previous methods considerably improved the mechanical behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites, they required long duration for performance and needed to be considered consistently cost-effective.
Carbon fiber is a kind of one-dimensional carbon material with excellent properties, such as high tensile strength, low weight, high chemical resistance, high temperature tolerance, and excellent electrical conductivity, making them very popular in many fields.