carbon dioxide


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carbon dioxide

 
an odorless, colorless gas, CO2, resulting from oxidation of carbon, formed in the tissues and eliminated by the lungs; used in some pump oxygenators to maintain the carbon dioxide tension in the blood. It is also used in solid form; see carbon dioxide snow and carbon dioxide slush.
carbon dioxide combining power the ability of blood plasma to combine with carbon dioxide; indicative of the alkali reserve and a measure of the acid-base balance of the blood.
carbon dioxide content the amount of carbonic acid and bicarbonate in the blood; reported in millimoles per liter.
carbon dioxide–oxygen therapy administration of a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen (commonly 5 per cent CO2 and 95 per cent O2 or 10 per cent CO2 and 90 per cent O2); used for improvement of cerebral blood flow, stimulation of deep breathing, or treatment of singultation (hiccupping). Carbon dioxide acts by stimulating the respiratory center; it also increases heart rate and blood pressure. Therapy is given for 6 minutes or less with a 5 per cent mixture and 2 minutes or less with a 10 per cent mixture. Potential adverse effects include headache, dizziness, dyspnea, nausea, tachycardia and high blood pressure, blurred vision, mental depression, coma, and convulsions.
carbon dioxide slush solid carbon dioxide combined with a solvent such as acetone, and sometimes also alcohol; used as an escharotic to treat skin lesions such as warts and moles and as a peeling agent in chemabrasion.
carbon dioxide snow the solid formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide, giving a temperature of about −79°C (−110°F). It has been used in cryotherapy to freeze the skin, thus producing local anesthesia and arrest of blood flow. See also carbon dioxide slush.

car·bon di·ox·ide (CO2),

the product of the combustion of carbon with an excess of oxygen; in concentrations not less than 99.0% by volume of CO2.

carbon dioxide

n.
A colorless, odorless, incombustible gas, CO2, that is formed during respiration, combustion, and organic decomposition, is an essential component in photosynthesis, and is used in food refrigeration, carbonated beverages, inert atmospheres, fire extinguishers, and aerosols. Also called carbonic acid gas.

carbon dioxide

CO2 Physiology A metabolic byproduct of carbohydrate metabolism; it accumulates in tissues, is released to the blood in veins, and is eliminated via the lungs

car·bon di·ox·ide

(CO2) (kahr'bŏn dī-oks'īd)
The product of the combustion of carbon with an excess of air; in concentrations not less than 99.0% by volume of CO2, used as a respiratory stimulant.

carbon dioxide

A compound in which an atom of carbon is linked to two atoms of oxygen (CO2 ). Carbon dioxide is a colourless, odourless gas and is one of the chief waste products of tissue metabolism.

carbon dioxide

a colourless, odourless gas, heavier than air, produced in respiration of organisms, and utilized to form sugars in PHOTOSYNTHESIS. Formula: CO2 .

Carbon dioxide

A heavy, colorless gas that dissolves in water.
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hypercapnia

The presence of a raised carbon dioxide content or tension in a milieu (e.g. blood, tears). Contact lens wear tends to give rise to this condition, especially lenses of low gas transmissibility. See acidosis.

car·bon di·ox·ide

(CO2) (kahr'bŏn dī-oks'īd)
Product of the combustion of carbon with an excess of oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the carbon dioxide comes back out with the oil, but that gets separated and reused in the wells.
The finding suggests the carbon dioxide has reacted with liquid water, which enriched the oxygen in carbon dioxide with the heavier oxygen-18.
Carbon Dioxide Released by Different Sources Each Year Industry 21% Transportation 19% fuels Homes, business, 13% and other sources Land use 9% Fossil fuel 8% processing and delivery Power 30% stations 1.
The magnitude of the warming effect of current carbon dioxide levels is not trivial.
What is the total amount of carbon dioxide produced in one year from using the appliances?
Carbon dioxide produces contrast by displacing blood instead of mixing with it, as other contrast agents do.
Yet while Bush's carbon dioxide pledge represented a political and policy breakthrough for advocates, the restriction of other e4nissions from power plants was a far more important public health goal in the near term.
A pounds 200,000 battle-chest has already been collected from local businesses ahead of the launch and will help fund a grant scheme for projects which can then help reduce carbon dioxide levels.
If you can capture atmospheric carbon dioxide, then you limit the environmental impact of fossil fuels."
The partnership will create a use for 60 percent of the Shell plant's excess carbon dioxide emissions, which previously went into the atmosphere as a waste product.
Frederick Law Olmsted, the grand-daddy of American landscape architecture, had little idea how prescient he was when he told the City of New York in 1872 that the midtown Manhattan park he was busy creating would serve as the "lungs of the city." Today, the urban forests found within city parks across the country serve not only as recreational and social centers, but also as organic sponges for various forms of pollution and as storehouses of carbon dioxide to help offset global warming.
In 2000, we published an updated decalogue in which we stated our new goal of zero-equivalent carbon dioxide emissions by 2010.