carbocation


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car·bon·i·um

(kar-bon'ē-ŭm),
An organic cation in which the positive charge is on a carbon atom;,for example, (CH3)+. It is now recommended that carbocation be used as the class name and carbenium for specific compound names.

carbocation

An often reactive anion with a positively charged carbon that has six electrons in its outer valence shell—i.e., it is missing two electrons that would ensure maximum stability.
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4 R-40 + 3 R-134a + [Al.sub.solid] = 3 R133a + Al[F.sub.4.sup.-] + 4 C[H.sub.3] + carbocation (2)
It turns out that particular meso-PCP+ structures involving primary carbocations are what slow down the chain-branching steps.
This result indicates that the reactivity of the carbocationic species generated during the polymerization process, which includes the initiating carbocations and chain propagating carbocations, were reactive enough to polymerize the vinylether groups of the VESFA, but not so reactive that they add to double bonds of the fatty acid portion of VESFA.
These chemical reactions would involve the formation of transient carbocation intermediates.
Experimental and theoretical evaluation of energetics for nucleophilic solvent participation in the solvolysis of tertiary alkyl chlorides on the basis of gas phase bridgehead carbocation stabilities.
A key aspect of this synthesis was the TMSOTf-mediated epoxide opening that proceeds trough a carbocation mechanism leading to the possibility of methyl migration and hydride shift side reactions.
This, and our detection of rearranged products (equation 2) suggest that the mechanism could involve either 1) elimination followed by addition of water and then another elimination, 2) elimination followed by protonation to form a different carbocation which then eliminates, or 3) a mechanism that is more "E2-lik e" for the stereoisomer which readily exists in an anti-periplanar conformation while the other stereoisomer reacts by a more "E1-like" mechanism.
They believed this was possible because carbon, a close relative on the periodic table, can form a "carbocation," which also has three bonds and a positive charge.
Considering that B1 is a secondary carbocation, its rearrangement to B2 (a tertiary carbocation) by means of a 1,2-alkyl shift is driven by the charge stabilization [33].
A reaction mechanism during the preparation was proposed, and the electron effect on the stabilization of the carbocation was discussed.
According to the reaction mechanism discussed previously, the solvolytic splitting of [alpha]-aryl ether in lignin resulted in the formation of a benzylic carbocation, which would react with different alcohols in an acidic medium.
The nitrogen stabilized carbocation is the conjugate acid of the imine and transfer of the hydrogen atom, attached to the nitrogen, to water yields the imine.