carapace

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carapace

(kăr′ə-pās′)
n.
Zoology A hard bony or chitinous outer covering, such as the fused dorsal plates of a turtle or the portion of the exoskeleton covering the head and thorax of a crustacean.

carapace

[kar′əpās]
Etymology: Sp, carapacho, hard shell
a horny shield or shell covering the dorsal surface of an animal such as a turtle.

carapace

the part of the exoskeleton of a CRUSTACEAN that spreads over the head and thorax; in other animals, e.g. the tortoise, the carapace is the dorsal covering of bony plates.

carapace

the dorsal shell of turtles and tortoises. Abnormalities are caused by trauma, dietary deficiencies (particularly nutritional hyperparathyroidism), infections, environmental factors and tumors.
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Carapace of the tortoise. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004
References in periodicals archive ?
Geometric morphometric techniques were used to evaluate morphological variation in shape and size of the carapace and right cheliped propodus.
The carapace is heavily armored, dorsoventrally flattened and relatively rough, composed of numerous small tubercles that offer favorable conditions as a biogenic surface for the settlement and growth of the oyster.
platensis in La Plata River basin (Giri & Collins, 2004); morphologic variation of adult males carapaces of A.
Figure 3 (a,b,c,d,e) presents the results of fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for chitosan samples isolated from shrimp head waste, crab leg shells, crab claws crab carapaces and pure chitosan, respectively.
Females were longer than males among the individuals with CL less than 4 cm whereas males were larger than females in specimens with longer carapace.
ESD is characterized by severe, deep erosions of the cuticle that extend laterally and, more characteristic of this disease than others, spreads irregularly over the dorsal carapace of the animal (Smolowitz et al.
The differences in sexual dimorphism in each species were analyzed using ANCOVA, with the straight carapace length as a covariable in order to rule out the effect of size on form (Bonnet et al.
With the turtles at the modern pond sites, the carapaces were either up or down in nearly equal ratios (see Tables 1 and 2).
I have also learned that the encrusters on horseshoe crabs have preferred orientations and locations on the carapace," she continued.
Researchers in New Jersey recently examined 53 living wood turtles that had been injured by predators, and 27 of them were missing limbs while 11 others had mutilated carapaces.