captioning


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captioning

noun A text display of spoken words presented on a television or movie screen which allows a deaf or hard-of-hearing viewer to follow the dialogue and the action of a program simultaneously.

verb To provide or create a text display of spoken worfs presented on a television or movie screen for the hard of hearing or deaf.

captioning

The display of spoken words as text on a television or a movie screen, to improve the comprehension of dialogue by hearing-impaired individuals.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a concept, captioning is really simple--it's just blocks of text with specific time-code markers as to where they start and end.
The Captioning Group uses the highest-quality software to provide the end product necessary for a wide variety of outputs, from web-based to broadcast.
Additionally, captioning allows for silent viewing at times when sound in public areas is disruptive.
Kulczar cites the example of the 2017 Tennis US Open, where IBM Watson Media powered closed captioning of the event, and was able to navigate nuanced tennis lingo.
Communication Access Realtime Translation, commonly known as CART (see "Quality control in captions," page 45), is the latest in live captioning. It provides exact, word-for-word transcription on computer screens or mobile devices, such as iPads or smartphones, for students and audience members.
* Captioning enhances visibility to search engines.
Vitac is the largest provider of closed captioning in the country, responsible for captioning approximately 300,000 live-program hours per year (over 600 hours per day), and creating verbatim, precisely-timed captions for 57,000 pre-recorded programs per year.
In March, Ericsson announced multi-year captioning contracts with Australian public service broadcasters, ABC and SBS.
Further, should the Commission, as one commenter suggested, place the onus on video programmers to certify quality captioning and make the certification widely available to the public?
For broadcast programming, videos and films, the usual captioning approach is that of closed captioning.
This method of captioning was unsatisfactory because it interrupted the flow of action of the film and that of the dialogue of the actors.
To help them overcome this, she has researched and is employing a rather novel approach: video captioning. Not to be confused with subtitles--which translate what on-screen speakers are saying into a different language--captions are superimposed on video images as printed supplements to on-screen dialogue.