captain of the ship doctrine


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Related to captain of the ship doctrine: borrowed servant doctrine
An adaptation from the ‘borrowed servant rules’, as applied to an operating room, which arose in McConnell v .Williams—Pennsylvania, 1949—holding the person in charge—e.g., a surgeon—responsible for all those under his supervision, regardless of whether the ‘captain’ is directly responsible for an alleged error or act of alleged negligence, and despite the assistants’ positions as hospital employees

captain of the ship doctrine

Medical malpractice An adaptation from the 'borrowed servant rules', as applied to an operating room, which arose in McConnell v Williams, holding the person in charge–eg, a surgeon responsible for all under his supervision, regardless of whether the 'captain' is directly responsible for an alleged error or act of alleged negligence, and despite the assistants' positions as hospital employees. See 'Borrowed servant. ', Respondeat superior.

cap·tain of the ship doc·trine

(kap'tăn ship dok'trin)
The legal principle that the responsibility and accountability for patient care lie with the supervising physician, regardless of whether that clinician has performed the procedure in question.

Captain of the Ship doctrine

The legal doctrine, a form of vicarious liability, that the legal responsibility for errors in a medical setting falls on the most highly trained or senior health care provider present at the time. This doctrine has been used to hold attending physicians or surgeons responsible for the negligent acts of the surgical or anesthesia team. See: borrowed servant doctrine; vicarious liability
See also: doctrine