capsid

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Related to capsids: Icosahedral capsid, Capsid proteins

capsid

 [kap´sid]
the shell of protein that protects the nucleic acid of a virus; it is composed of structural units, or capsomers. According to the number of subunits possessed by capsomers, they are called dimers (2), trimers (3), pentamers (5), or hexamers (6).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cap·sid

(kap'sid),
Protein coat of a virus. See: virion.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

capsid

(kăp′sĭd)
n.
The protein coat that constitutes the shell of a virus particle.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

capsid

A protein coat that covers the nucleoprotein core or nucleic acid (RNA, DNA) of a free virus particle or phage, which may have icosahedral symmetry and itself be enclosed in an envelope—e.g., Togaviridae. It is composed of an integer multiple of 60 subunits, which self-assemble in a pattern typical for a particular virus.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

vi·ri·on

(vī'rē-on)
The complete virus particle that is structurally intact and infectious.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

capsid

The protein coat that encloses the genome of a virus.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

capsid

the protein coat of a virus.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Capsid

The outer protein coat of a virus.
Mentioned in: Noroviruses
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike for viruses, activating neurons mobilizes Arc, triggering the release of capsids.
This rapidly progressive liver injury is believed to be attributed to a sudden strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to the presence of HBV, enhanced viral replication, and/or retention of viral capsid in HBV-infected hepatocytes [2, 3].
The self-assembly of the viral particle needs a single viral capsid protein To make VLP vaccines.
HIV binds to receptors on human cells and then delivers the capsid inside them.
This result could be because a more complex capsid could provide protection from ozone.
The new quasicrystal-inspired framework indicated how a multitude of pentamers could arrange into seamless capsids. What's more, the framework showed how smaller groupings of proteins could the into a variety of shapes, among them triangles and diamonds.
These epitopes are highly conformational, and are formed by amino acid residues contributed from more than one capsid protein.
Capsids play a major role as viruses can reproduce themselves only by invading a host cell and highjacking its biochemical machinery.
By tinkering with the ability of protein "bricks" to assemble into one of the two fortress-like shells -- known as coats or capsids -- surrounding the lethal genetic core of HIV, these scientists hope to force the virus to build a defective packaging that disarms its infectious spread.
ABO-401 has a regulatable human mini-CFTR gene that is efficiently packaged into one of the company's next-generation AIM library capsids, AAV204.