capital

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capital

[kap′itəl]
Etymology: L, caput, head
1 of the highest importance; involving danger to life.
2 of or pertaining to the head of the femur.

capital

An expenditure by an NHS institution on the acquisition of land, premises (including new and refurbished), equipment and vehicles etc. An expenditure is regarded as capital if it is in excess of £5,000.

capital

(căp′ĭ-tăl) [L. capitalis]
Pert. to the head.

capital

pertaining to the head.

capital femoral epiphysis
epiphysis of the head of the femur; its detachment represents a specific syndrome in pigs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The real locus of capitalistic economic development lay in just such local responses to market opportunities, and especially in the trade networks created by custom millers and by general storekeepers.
The strengths and weaknesses of Kristofferson's book are exhibited in the final chapter, as the Nine Hours Movement of 1872 is described as a divergence of this transmodal culture of mutualism in the face of increasing capitalistic pressure.
True free market thinkers believe zoning is unnecessary because it artificially overrides basic capitalistic economics that dictate that land should always be utilized to its highest and best use for the benefit of owners, consumers, and the general economy.
Ritz-Carlton plans to open a 332-room consummately capitalistic hotel within walking distance of the Kremlin by year's end.
The bean's extensive cultivation and worldwide popularity echoes capitalistic and political development in both the third world countries that produce coffee and the wealthy nations addicted to its stimulating effect.
Both books explore the use of love within the context of alienation in a capitalistic society.
In Brazil, no two bedfellows could be odder than the table-thumping left-wing Workers Party (PT) and the expansionist capitalistic bank Bradesco.
In Exterior City, 2005, the social system of the welfare state is revealed as a capitalistic pretext or a quasi-utopia.
Again and again, Bellow presents us with a main character, a seeking, dissatisfied intellectual who seems ill-prepared for a modern existence that is brutish and cruelly capitalistic.
In our capitalistic system, a product comes to the forefront because many 'volunteers' and organizations, as well as a few businesses, enter the market before there is enough consumer demand or distribution and push that item.
It's ironic that having demonstrated the virtues of the capitalistic system, American policy makers are now trying to recreate the governance regime of the Napoleonic Code that our ancestors fled.