capital

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capital

An expenditure by an NHS institution on the acquisition of land, premises (including new and refurbished), equipment and vehicles etc. An expenditure is regarded as capital if it is in excess of £5,000.

capital

(căp′ĭ-tăl) [L. capitalis]
Pert. to the head.
References in periodicals archive ?
This book is said to be about economic life as a whole and how a 'decent capitalism' could be constructed which delivers to all people and is lot less crisis-ridden and more sustainable than the current variants of capitalism.
Shibusawa's Confucian capitalism was essentially an ideological strategy to create both ethical guidelines and a positive new identity for the commercial classes.
It is widely but mistakenly believed that German socialist Karl Marx (1818-1883) coined the term "capitalism." Marx is rightly characterized as the most prominent 19th-century critic of capitalism, which he painted as a system by which capitalists steal wealth by exploiting or underpaying labor.
Together, these essays suggest as emerging themes in the field: a fascination with capitalism as it is made by political authority, how it is claimed and contested by participants, how it spreads across the globe, and how it can be reconceptualized without being universalized.
These emerged in the West mainly due to capitalism's needs too.
These new subjectivities, the book aims to show, are tied up in capitalism's ability to subsume urban residents' social relationships, senses of self, and communities into its circuits of accumulation.
After making its readers cognizant of the relationship between security and capitalism, Rigakos is then able to make a case for why critical scholars need to understand how security enforces capitalism.
Mark Weinberger, EY Global Chairman and CEO, says, The Inclusive Capitalism movement recognizes that we need to act with a shared direction towards driving investments that create long-term value, not merely short term profits.
The spread of capitalist ideals in countries across the world saw a renewed interest in re-visiting the system's nature, origins, strengths, weaknesses and adaptability, resulting in a number of publications giving a new insight into capitalism. Writings of Hartmut Elsenhans--self-professed capitalist whose writings are difficult to be endorsed by capitalists or even the non-capitalists--are a good example in this regard.
Both of these accounts are anchored in the realities of capitalism. It is not an illusion that capitalism has transformed the material conditions of life in the world and enormously increased human productivity; many people have benefited from this.
Bell has no desire to baptize capitalism or in any way rehabilitate its more negative elements.
" To see how intrusive and inextricable capitalism has become in our daily lives look at how it has wandered into areas where it does not belong.