capital costs


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

capital costs

An enterprise’s financial liabilities—e.g., depreciation, interest, leases and rentals, taxes and insurance—on tangible (capital) assets (e.g., physical plant and equipment).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
'The next technical steps of the project are to further optimise the capital cost where possible, optimise elements of the process to reduce operating cost, and to validate the vanadium recovery option.
H4--There is a significant relationship between the percentage changes in the total retained earnings and reserves with the percentage changes in capital cost.
Prasert said the most-affected industry is the textiles sector whose capital cost is 7.73% higher, followed by food and beverages (6.12%) and electronics (5.63%).
Capital Cost: The capital cost of any solution is always a major consideration for any client.
Renaissance Capital remains positive on the near-term outlook for iron ore prices, believes that iron ore producers with growth projects in emerging geographies look increasingly more attractive than their Australian peers, considering their lower capital cost estimates and significant trade discounts.
Commenting on the publication Dr Andrzej M Kotas, Managing Director of MCI said "The objective of writing this report was to identify the capital costs involved in the construction of any main part of a modern steelworks.
Total capital costs including closure are estimated at USD76.1m including the processing plant estimated at USD41.8m (including 35% contingency) and capital costs for infrastructure and support facilities estimated at USD13.1m (including 30% contingency).
Phase 1 capital costs total CDD169.5m and life-of-mine cash operating costs are CDD260 per ounce gold, producing an unlevered, after-tax internal rate of return of 28.1% (at USD700 per ounce of gold and USD12 per ounce of silver).
In a traditional commercial office lease, the way capital costs and operating expenses are allocated between landlord and tenants often provides a disincentive to the landlord to invest in energy savings initiatives.
Mr Brown favours PFI because the capital costs do not have to be financed by public borrowing.
Would cover pay-and-display running costs and pay back capital costs over two years.
The project was slated to be completed in 1999 but was shelved in 2002 as capital costs tripled to $366 million.

Full browser ?