capacity

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Related to capacitive: capacitive load, Capacitive reactance

capacity

 [kah-pas´ĭ-te]
the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.
closing capacity (CC) the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure, the sum of the closing volume and the residual volume. See also closing volume.
decreased intracranial adaptive capacity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which intracranial fluid dynamic mechanisms that normally compensate for increases in intracranial volumes are compromised, resulting in repeated disproportionate increases in intracranial pressure in response to a variety of noxious and nonnoxious stimuli.
diffusing capacity see diffusing capacity.
forced vital capacity the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inhalation by exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific quantity of a substance by one degree Celsius.
inspiratory capacity the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inhalation, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity maximum voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity heat capacity.
total lung capacity the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inhalation.
 Subdivisions of total lung capacity: TLC, total lung capacity; V, tidal volume; IC, inspiratory capacity; FRC, functional residual capacity; ERV, expiratory reserve volume; VC, vital capacity; RV, residual volume. From Dorland's, 2000.
virus neutralizing capacity the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity (VC) see vital capacity.

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē),
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
See also: volume.
2. Power to do.
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]

capacity

/ca·pac·i·ty/ (kah-pas´ĭ-te) the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.
forced vital capacity  (FVC) vital capacity measured when the patient is exhaling with maximal speed and effort.
functional residual capacity  the amount of air remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity  the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific quantity of a substance by one degree Celsius. Symbol C.
inspiratory capacity  the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inhalation, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity  maximum voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity  heat c.
total lung capacity  the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inhalation.
Enlarge picture
Subdivisions of total lung capacity: TLC, total lung capacity; VT, tidal volume; IC, inspiratory capacity; FRC, functional residual capacity; ERV, expiratory reserve volume; VC, vital capacity; RV, residual volume.
virus neutralizing capacity  the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity  VC; the volume of gas that can be expelled from the lungs from a position of full inspiration, with no limit to duration of inspiration; equal to inspiratory capacity plus expiratory reserve volume.

capacity

[kəpas′i·tē]
Etymology: L, capacitas
1 the power or ability to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb.
2 mental ability to receive, accomplish, endure, or understand. See also capacitance.
3 the volume or potential volume of material (solid, liquid, or gas) that can be held or contained.

capacity

Medspeak-UK
A generic term for the sum of the resources available to an organisation, service or community, including people, money, equipment, expertise, skills and information.

Psychology
A term referring to a person’s ability to understand and retain information about his/her medical condition and need for treatment.

capacity

Patient rights The capability of a person to function as an autonomous unit. See Testamentary capacity.

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē)
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
2. Ability to do something mental or physical.
See also: volume
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]

capacity

the ability to store an electric charge, measured in farads (Fd).

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē)
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
See also: volume
2. Power to do.
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]

capacity

the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.

carrying capacity
closing capacity (CC)
the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure. See also closing volume.
forced vital capacity
the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inspiration exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity
the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity
thermal capacity.
inspiratory capacity
the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inspiration, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity
maximal voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity
the amount of heat absorbed by a body in being raised 1°C.
total lung capacity
the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inspiration.
virus neutralizing capacity
the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity
the volume of gas that can be expelled from the lungs from a position of full inspiration, with no limit to duration of expiration; equal to inspiratory capacity plus expiratory reserve volume.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the results both of the capacitive Probe and the capacitance readout circuits have an important role in the accuracy of the absolute measured values for different type of conducting and non-conducting liquids.
Figure 3 and Figure 4 show the shielding effectiveness of the enclosure with a capacitive window and an inductive window, respectively.
The alpha miss rate is higher with capacitive probes or on tires that do not have a clear path to the sidewall for geometry testing.
Equally important, any capacitive bumps on gridlines are actually canceling energy at the lobe of interest; therefore, it would be a mistake to fix them.
The ScenEx PA system uses the PMS-A capacitive sensor, which is installed in the collapsing frame and measures while in contact with the film.
is now stocking the new TouchXpress capacitive touch controllers from Silicon Labs.
The PIC16LF1554/9 includes two independent 10-bit 100K samples per second Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC) with hardware Capacitive Voltage Divider (CVD) support for capacitive-touch sensing.
Intex Aqua i-4 boasts of a 5-inch capacitive touch screen and is powered by a 1.
com)-- Capacitive sensors are devices that enable the measurement of the position of a conductive or nonconductive surface.
As capacitive sensors integrate more with emerging technology, replacing more traditional buttons, design engineers are able to get rather creative with how they can design them into devices.