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capacity

 [kah-pas´ĭ-te]
the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.
closing capacity (CC) the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure, the sum of the closing volume and the residual volume. See also closing volume.
decreased intracranial adaptive capacity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which intracranial fluid dynamic mechanisms that normally compensate for increases in intracranial volumes are compromised, resulting in repeated disproportionate increases in intracranial pressure in response to a variety of noxious and nonnoxious stimuli.
diffusing capacity see diffusing capacity.
forced vital capacity the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inhalation by exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific quantity of a substance by one degree Celsius.
inspiratory capacity the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inhalation, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity maximum voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity heat capacity.
total lung capacity the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inhalation.
 Subdivisions of total lung capacity: TLC, total lung capacity; V, tidal volume; IC, inspiratory capacity; FRC, functional residual capacity; ERV, expiratory reserve volume; VC, vital capacity; RV, residual volume. From Dorland's, 2000.
virus neutralizing capacity the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity (VC) see vital capacity.

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē),
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
See also: volume.
2. Power to do.
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]

capacity

Medspeak-UK
A generic term for the sum of the resources available to an organisation, service or community, including people, money, equipment, expertise, skills and information.

Psychology
A term referring to a person’s ability to understand and retain information about his/her medical condition and need for treatment.

capacity

Patient rights The capability of a person to function as an autonomous unit. See Testamentary capacity.

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē)
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
2. Ability to do something mental or physical.
See also: volume
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]

capacity

the ability to store an electric charge, measured in farads (Fd).

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē)
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
See also: volume
2. Power to do.
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]
References in periodicals archive ?
Certainly, the strain on available supplies will test buying capacities of many traders in the next years.
Benefits of Assessing Functional Limitations and Capacities
The declining utilization levels resulting from rapidly increasing capacities without corresponding performance increases are quickly becoming a major concern for savvy storage administrators.
Rotationally molded polyethylene cooling towers come in capacities from 10 to 500 tons or larger.
The typical high-capacity tape cartridges now have native capacities of 200-500 gigabytes and a compressed capacity of 400 gigabytes to over 1TB using a 2-to-1 compression ratio.
Hard-drive designers have responded with a move in recent years from one to three available spindle speeds, from one to two available form factors, and with an increased focus on higher available notebook hard-drive capacities and additional onboard cache, further diversifying the hard drives now available for the notebook market.
Heater sizes from 6 kw and up, pumping capacities from 10 gpm and up, and single- and dual-zone configurations.
Disk-drive projections indicate capacities of nearly 5 terabytes in 2013 and native tape cartridge capacities ranging as high as 10 terabytes by 2013.
Do higher tape capacities mean increased data access times?
Capacities from 500 to 1500 cfm, it can be improve bubble cooling.
And even as disk capacities have dramatically increased over the past 10 years, the tape industry has continually maintained a capacity advantage over disk; a single tape cartridge can be used to backup the contents of a single hard drive.
For filled and reinforced plastics, machines with frame capacities of 5000 to 7000 lb are often needed.