capacity

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capacity

 [kah-pas´ĭ-te]
the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.
closing capacity (CC) the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure, the sum of the closing volume and the residual volume. See also closing volume.
decreased intracranial adaptive capacity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which intracranial fluid dynamic mechanisms that normally compensate for increases in intracranial volumes are compromised, resulting in repeated disproportionate increases in intracranial pressure in response to a variety of noxious and nonnoxious stimuli.
diffusing capacity see diffusing capacity.
forced vital capacity the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inhalation by exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific quantity of a substance by one degree Celsius.
inspiratory capacity the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inhalation, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity maximum voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity heat capacity.
total lung capacity the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inhalation.
 Subdivisions of total lung capacity: TLC, total lung capacity; V, tidal volume; IC, inspiratory capacity; FRC, functional residual capacity; ERV, expiratory reserve volume; VC, vital capacity; RV, residual volume. From Dorland's, 2000.
virus neutralizing capacity the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity (VC) see vital capacity.

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē),
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
See also: volume.
2. Power to do.
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]

capacity

Medspeak-UK
A generic term for the sum of the resources available to an organisation, service or community, including people, money, equipment, expertise, skills and information.

Psychology
A term referring to a person’s ability to understand and retain information about his/her medical condition and need for treatment.

capacity

Patient rights The capability of a person to function as an autonomous unit. See Testamentary capacity.

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē)
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
2. Ability to do something mental or physical.
See also: volume
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]

capacity

the ability to store an electric charge, measured in farads (Fd).

ca·pac·i·ty

(kă-pas'i-tē)
1. The potential cubic contents of a cavity or receptacle.
See also: volume
2. Power to do.
[L. capax, able to contain; fr. capio, to take]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Laparoscopic Mode offers optimal safety by limiting output voltage through microprocessor controlled circuitry and minimizes the potentially harmful effects of capacitative coupling.
Special Mention: iPhone 5S - this phone was the first to have a capacitative fingerprint scanner.
* current diversion, which may be caused by insulation defects, direct coupling to another conductive device, or capacitative coupling, a process that can occur through adjacent instruments that are not in contact or even those that are coated with intact insulation (TABLE, page S11).
Regulation of capacitative [Ca.sup.2+] influx in human neutrophil granulocytes.
The first-generation Galaxy Note 8 also comes with a TFT capacitative touchscreen, 16M colors that offer 800 x 1200 pixels, 8-inch display with a 189 ppi pixel density.
Suppression of EGF-induced cell proliferation by the blockade of [Ca.sup.2+] mobilization and capacitative [Ca.sup.2+] entry in mouse mammary epithelial cell.
If the load has an inductive or capacitative component, the voltage and current are out of phase and the power is reduced by what is known as the power factor, which is less than one.
" It is basically a highly responsive capacitative piece of glass with solid state memory and an IPS display.
Nanoindentation equipment normally employs electromagnetic or electrostatic devices to apply and measure the force and a capacitative device to measure displacement.
Burt, R.P., Chapple, C.R., Marshall, I.: The role of capacitative calcium influx in the [[alpha].sub.1B]-adrenoceptor mediated contraction to phenylephrine in the rat spleen.
By using the Mach-Zehnder device electrodes as a capacitative loading to the RF line, the velocities of the optical and microwave signal can be matched.