canyon


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canyon

Radiation safety
A popular term for a plutonium reprocessing plant—e.g., in Hanford, Washington, or the Savannah River Site (SRS), which is 440 m tall.

Sport medicine
See Canyoning.
References in classic literature ?
He was at the edge of another of those terrible canyons, the eighth he had crossed, whose precipitous sides would have taxed to the uttermost the strength of an untired man well fortified by food and water, and for the first time, as he looked down into the abyss and then at the opposite side that he must scale, misgivings began to assail his mind.
In the morning he stole a march on the sun, for he had finished breakfast when its first rays caught him, and he was climbing the wall of the canyon where it crumbled away and gave footing.
Once, far down his own canyon, he thought he saw in the air a faint hint of smoke.
Pocket!" he called down into the canyon. "Stand out from under!
An' right here an' now I name this yere canyon 'All Gold Canyon,' b' gosh!"
ACCESS: The canyon lies about 3 hours northeast of Flagstaff, and 5 hours northeast of Phoenix, so it's a drive.
Not only does this resource include Grand Canyon access information for wheelchair users and slow walkers, but it also features a comprehensive access guide to Arizona's Interstate 40 and Route 66.
According to Grand Canyon officials, the park rangers responded to a call around 1 p.m.
Grand Canyon West is owned and operated by the Hualapai Tribe and is not part of Grand Canyon National Park.
"We didn't want to encourage people coming into the canyon doing what was done in the movie, so we declined it," said Maureen Oltrogge, a longtime spokeswoman for the national park who retired in 2014.
royalty and other rights on specified lands around the Relief Canyon project, the company said.
This encyclopedia consists of essays and entries on the geography, history, and culture of the Grand Canyon. The essays relate to the Grand CanyonAEs ancient beginnings, the Postcard Rocks, how the Colorado River carved the Grand Canyon, its first people, tribes that called the Grand Canyon their home, John Wesley Powell, territorial and water disputes, the historic sites of the Colorado River, the Grand Canyon and modern Christian fundamentalism, and the future of the Grand Canyon.