cantholysis


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Related to cantholysis: melanocarcinoma, stenocephaly, vasorrhaphy

cantholysis

 [kan-thol´ĭ-sis]
surgical section of a canthus or a canthal ligament.

can·tho·plas·ty

(kan'thō-plas'tē),
Any of several procedures for changing the configuration or position of the lateral canthus; used to correct deformities caused by trauma, disease, or prior surgery; may also provide additional support to the lower eyelid by moving or tightening connections from the tarsal plate to the orbital rim. Synonym(s): cantholysis
See also: canthopexy.
[G. kanthos, canthus, + plassō, to form]

can·tho·plas·ty

(kan'thō-plas-tē)
1. Disruption of canthal tendon insertion; often performed surgically.
Synonym(s): cantholysis.
2. An operation for restoration of the canthus.
[G. kanthos, canthus, + plassō, to form]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Traumatic orbital compartment syndrome: Importance of the lateral canthomy and cantholysis. Emerg Med Australas 2014;26:274-8.
When combined with cantholysis, even a defect occupying up to 50% or more of the eyelid may be closed directly [7].
The lateral canthotomy and cantholysis was then performed, and it adequately relieved the intraocular pressure.
A wide excision of the lesion along with lid margin was performed and lid was reconstructed by direct closure with lateral cantholysis under general anaesthesia.
Latetal canthotomy and inferior cantholysis: an effective method of urgent orbital decompression for sight threatening acute retrobulbar haemorrhage.
Later in the day her visual acuity had deteriorated to 2/21 and an urgent lateral canthotomy and cantholysis was performed.
Upper eyelid full-thickness eyelid defect with 30-60% of horizontal tissue loss is reconstructed by primary closure as described above after release and advancement of lateral tissue by lateral canthotomy followed by cantholysis.
If significant horizontal laxity was present (identified with an eyelid distraction test, snap back test, or both preoperatively), a lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis were performed before securing the tarsoconjunctival flap to the posterior lamella.
Initially, cantholysis should be performed, including both a lateral canthotomy and canthal tendon disinsertion.
Tumoural defects that occupy less than 25% of superior eyelids could be fixed with primary saturation after transformation to a pentagonal shape, but full thickness defects that occupy 25-50% of the eyelid need lateral and medial canthotomy and cantholysis. Also, Tenzel semicircular flaps could be used in defects that occupy more than 50% of superior eyelids and have 2 mm tars tissue laterally and medially.
In order to release the orbital pressure and prevent further compression of the optic nerve, lateral cantholysis was performed.
Needle decompression or lateral canthotomy with cantholysis can be performed in the acute setting.