canon

(redirected from canonicity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

canon

(1) Dogma, see there.
(2) Paradigm, see there.
(3) Working rule, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neavill investigates issues of canonicity in relation to reprint publishing and copyright in the eighteenth century and Simon Eliot describes the early years of the Clarendon Press Series and the transition from learned printers to modern publishers in chapter 4.
The examples provided also agree on the need to formulate different degrees of predictability based on a work's canonicity (a canonical work will in principle generate more dialogues) and aesthetic value (the more the aesthetic qualities of a work, the more the chances of belonging to the canon of great books), on readers' reaction in reception (scandals will tend to generate more echoes), on forms of echo-dialogues (such as the number of copies, editions and sequels of a work, the number of literary prizes received).
Above all, Murakami's insistence that canonical literature must speak to Japanese youth tends to scuttle their qualifications for canonicity.
We may also observe an interest in a series of problems having to do with the canon, the canonicity, the genesis and the historicity of the Pentateuch, all of which are meant to outline certain fundamental guidelines for a correct reading of the revealed texts.
Finally, there are two fascinating essays on issues of literary canonicity.
In Valentine's words, one can almost discern the seeds of one-hundred years' worth of healthy, spirited, and rigorous debate about pedagogy, theory, and canonicity.
While it "considers the place of diverse social variables in the process of literary creation and reception" (12), it also focuses on "the problem of race relations in Brazil, the connections between culture and politics, the correlation between race and canonicity, and the question of race and gender in black women's writing" (12).
1) Luther was certainly not the only one who had serious reservations about the canonicity of the book of Esther.
Newman has produced some highly sophisticated and nuanced discussions as a result, in which canonical texts (of varying degrees of canonicity, it must be said: I'm unaware of any canon that includes D'Urfey's Pills to Purge Melancholy or Ramsay's Tea-Table Miscellany) are seen as negotiating between elite and popular cultural forms in widely differentiated ways.
She does so by casting a critical eye over the untested assumptions on which most modern dance scholarship rests: assumptions about the existence of a pan-European tradition of choreography, for instance, or about the canonicity of works like the Orchesographie of Thoinot Arbeau.
I share her desire to wrest the discourse of citizenship away from politicians and technocrats in order to emphasize the civic dimension of literary study, but questions remain about the relationship between the literature of citizenship and the citizenship of literary study, including questions of authorial identity, canonicity, and the complexities of the manner in which a "literary" work represents itself to the broader world.
The papers collected in this valuable contribution to Chartier studies, and to fifteenth-century studies in general, are informed by critical discourse on translation, reception, codicology, gender, canonicity, and authority and are concise and well-executed, balancing theoretical framework with philological rigor.