canon

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canon

(1) Dogma, see there.
(2) Paradigm, see there.
(3) Working rule, see there.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As discussed by Kyle Gann, Nancarrow's canonic technique follows an approximate progression from the early, fairly straightforward tempo-proportion canons to the later canons he calls the "sound-mass" canons, in which the canon itself is not the focus of the work, but, rather, the means to achieve a highly complex, multidimensional texture.
Morley presents his canonic examples in two versions: in note-against-note counterpoint and in diminished counterpoint, or `plaine' and `divided' as he terms them.
The series focuses on religions as they are practiced rather than on the way they are presented in their respective canonic literatures.
Shouldn't such unanimity--as opposed to canonic sequence, say--be employed in a finale?
But there is no warrant for investing this edition with a canonic status and for regarding it as uniquely authoritative.
Less so the famed Sonata of Csar Franck, which seemed quite inhibited and, especially in the cheery bell-like canonic finale, too darkly hued.
A key transformational pattern is introduced early on, when the canonic relationship between the hands in the first two measures is repeated in the next two with slight variations in rhythm and temporal proximity, and with the left hand a minor third higher.
The second part of the book opens out from the first in a number of senses, taking the reader beyond the Italian Renaissance, beyond well-studied canonic pairings of poetry and painting, and beyond the paradigm of an harmonious and unified blurring and de-emphasizing of the distinctions between the nature of poetry and painting and the scholarship devoted to them: literary criticism and art history.
But despite this promising beginning, Cable herself turns away from metaphor ("rather than dealing with it") and discusses instead her sense of Milton's evolving understanding of the relationship between truth and image, between "the idea" and "that which is fixed, canonic, and binding." Although many of her subsequent observations are provocative, they are inevitably disappointing - roughly on the scale of the annoyance one feels over an instance of "bait and switch" at the supermarket.
Carnap's distorted version of Popper's views became canonic for a generation and blocked their public exposure.
Similarly, in the Quaderno musicale di Annalibera - which others have too often discussed purely in terms of its structural aspects and its highly sensitive use of dodecaphony and of neo-Bachian canonic techniques - Quattrocchi skilfully jolts us into viewing the work from a new angle not only by pointing out the substantial debt of the tenth piece ('Ombre') to Musorgsky's ever-disconcerting 'Catacombs' but also by suggesting that the intricately interwoven canonic processes of, for example, the third piece ('Contrapunctus primus') are not necessarily the most important aspects of its sound-world for listeners, however intriguing they may be for performers and score-followers.
On the complex subject of intertextuality itself, the author resorts to the canonic works of Julia Kristeva, Gerard Genette, and Lucien Dallembach.