canon law


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canon law

A body of law and edicts that arise from and are adopted by an ecclesiastic authority, which guides how Christian organisations are governed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The relationship between Canon Law, which is applicable only to Catholics, and Civil Law is a very complex matter, and needs to be treated by a person who is qualified both in Canon Law and in Civil Law.
cited this text in his address to the Canon Law Society of America in 2004.
For example, there is the practical issue of whether a counterpart to the Code of Canon Law requirements on marriage preparation can be created under civil law, and how.
The history of canon law demonstrates that the attitudes expressed by the Australian religious brothers started gaining traction in the Church only in the last 150 years, and became the dominant culture with the promulgation of the first Code of Canon Law in 1917.
The next two chapters perfectly illustrate their observation: Peter Landau's essay on the sources of the Decretum and the methods employed by Gratian to produce his standard textbook of medieval canon law is followed by Rudolf Weigand's overview of the countless glosses written with the express purpose of making Gratian's oddly organized collection more accessible.
The fact of the matter is that canon law has always allowed for considerable variety and flexibility in the juridic structures that are available for establishing and administering Catholic schools.
Historians also need to appreciate how papal authority was maintained despite local Canon law courts by the use of such Roman offices as the Apostolic Penitentiary that could grant particular graces such as an overriding power of absolution or dispensation, as Kirsi Salonen shows in a study of void monastic professions.
More significantly, he argues, it suggests "scattered evidence" of an oral tradition in canon law in the eleventh century (9).
Catholic collections strong in ministry resources and canon law provide an excellent survey of 19th century U.
It is based on the remarkably complete archival records of the colleges of civil law and canon law, the organs that examined degree candidates.
Ribordy explores both formal legal strictures of canon law and the extent to which aristocratic practice paid only lip-service to such canons, as well as how much and on what issues contemporary Churchmen upheld, or caved in, on matters of canon law.
Surprised By Canon Law: 150 Questions Catholics Ask About Canon Law, co-authored by canon law experts Pete Vere and Michael Trueman provides non-specialist general readers, Catholic and non-Catholic alike, a sound and practical guide to the oldest code extent in Christianity.