cannula

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Related to cannulae: nasal cannulae

cannula

 [kan´u-lah]
a tube for insertion into a vessel, duct, or cavity. During insertion its lumen is usually occupied by a trocar; following placement, the trocar is removed and the cannula remains patent as a channel for the flow of fluids.
nasal cannula one that fits into the nostrils for delivery of oxygen therapy. Called also nasal prongs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă),
A tube that can be inserted into a cavity, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen; after insertion of the cannula, the trocar is withdrawn and the cannula remains as a channel for the transport of fluid or passage of instruments.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cannula

also

canula

(kăn′yə-lə)
n. pl. cannu·las or cannu·lae (-lē′)
A flexible tube, usually containing a trocar at one end, that is inserted into a bodily cavity, duct, or vessel to drain fluid or administer a substance such as a medication.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cannula

A tube inserted into a duct, cavity or other space; its lumen is maintained closed by a trocar during insertion.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cannula

Surgery A tube inserted into a duct, cavity or other space; during insertion, its lumen is occluded by a trocar. See Endoscopy, Nasal cannula, QuickDrawvenous cannula, Trocar.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă)
A tube that can be inserted into a cavity or vein, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen; after insertion of the cannula, the trocar is withdrawn and the cannula remains as a channel for the transport of fluid. Intravenous cannulas should be changed regularly to prevent thrombophlebitis.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cannula

(kan'u-la) [L., a small reed]
Enlarge picture
NEEDLELESS CANNULAE USED TO CONNECT AN ADDITIVE TO PRIMARY INTRAVENOUS INFUSIONS
A tube or sheath that encloses a trocar. After the device is inserted into a blood vessel, body cavity, duct, or hollow organ, withdrawal of the trocar lets fluid drain (so that it can be collected or sampled) or escape. See: illustration

Bellocq's cannula

See: Bellocq's cannula
Enlarge picture
NASAL CANNULA FOR OXYGEN DELIVERY.

nasal cannula

Tubing used to deliver oxygen at levels from 1 to 6 L/min. The nasal prongs of the cannula extend approx. 1 cm into each naris and are connected to a common tube, which is then connected to the oxygen source. It is used to treat conditions in which a slightly enriched oxygen content is needed, such as emphysema. The exact percentage of oxygen delivered to the patient varies with respiratory rate and other factors.
illustrationillustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

cannula

A hollow surgical tube, into which is inserted a close fitting, sharp-pointed inner stiffener called a trocar. The combination can easily be pushed through the skin or the lining of a blood vessel or other tissue. When in position, the trocar is pulled backwards out of the cannula, leaving the latter in place. Fluids or other materials may then be passed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Cannula

A tube inserted into a cavity to serve as a channel for the transport of fluid.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă)
Tube that can be inserted into a cavity, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cannulation success rate was defined as the insertion of two needles or cannulae only and the successful completion of the haemodialysis session without requiring re-cannulation.
During the time periods selected, a total of 28 patients started haemodialysis and were eligible to be included in the study, 16 in the metal needle group (prior to the plastic cannula training period) and 12 in the plastic cannulae group (post the end of the 16-month staff training period).
The overall cannulation success rate (with two cannulations only) was higher in the metal needle cohort (62.5%) compared to the plastic cannulae cohort (50%); however, in the plastic cannulae cohort there were no aborted dialysis sessions either at the beginning of dialysis or during dialysis and no patient required re-cannulation during a dialysis session.
The initial hypothesis for this study was that there would be fewer miscannulations and more overall cannulation success with the plastic cannulae, particularly as all staff had finished the training period and had reached a level of competence.
The plastic cannulae group did have a higher percentage of patients with diabetes and PVD (66%), compared with the metal group (55.5%) and a larger percentage of the metal group's AVF were less than six months old (56% versus 33%), which may have had an effect on the quality of the vessels to cannulate.
There has been an upsurge in the use of intravascular cannulae over past decade or so and a sequel to it was an improvement in the technique of insertion.
Overall infection rate from world literature for intravascular cannulae were 3.8% to 57%, whereas the overall colonization rate in this study was 8.4%, as compared to 3.8% to 34% from world literature.14
Many of the factors contributing to cannulae-associated inflammation are still uncertain, yet it appears that there is a causal relationship between inflammation and infection of cannulae wounds.15 Colonization has been reported internationally at rates from14%-71% for standard cannula, 33 with lower incidence for newer types of antimicrobial coated cannulas.16
No study prospectively examined the risk of infection caused by arterial cannulae until Gardner and co-workers cultured 200 consecutive radial artery cannulae and found 8 cannulae positive for growth in broth; none was considered to have produced septicemia.25 Most of them had been in-situ for less than four days and had been used to monitor patients who had undergone cardiovascular surgery.25 Many of the factors contributing to cannulae-associated inflammation are still uncertain, yet it appears that there is a causal relationship between inflammation and infection of cannulae wounds.
It has been established that the experience of the physician who inserts the intravascular cannulae is inversely proportional to the number of infected cannulae causing extended hospital stay and overall cost.26 Colonization also depends on the type of intravascular cannulae used, like metal cannulae have a lower incidence than do polyethylene cannulae.