cannibalism


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cannibalism

Nutrition
The eating of the flesh of one human by another.

Pathology
A term of art used in cytology for the partial or complete engulfing of one malignant cell by another, a not-uncommon finding in adenocarcinomas in pleural and peritoneal effusions.

Cannibalism
Symbolic
Surrogate flesh (e.g., bread wafers), is consumed to symbolise unification with a higher power; as in the sacrament Eucharist, in which Christ’s body is seen as imbued in the wafer distributed by the celebrant.

Although not known as cannibalism, the “eating” of the body of Christ, as practised by Christians, derives from certain practices by the ancient Greeks in which blood or body parts from priests were consumed; the sacrament of the Eucharist is believed by some to originate in eucharistia, Greek for gratitude.

Dietary/gastronomic
Eating of people for food.

Ritualistic
Actual flesh is consumed, divided into: 
• Endo-cannibalism—Consumption of a blood relative, respected and loved in life (see Morbid affection);
• Exo-cannibalism—flesh of those outside of one’s tribe, the typically fallen warriors, medicine men and virgins, were eaten to gain, respectively, bravery, wisdom and purity.
 
Necessity
Survival cannibalism.

cannibalism

(kan'i-bal-izm?)
The human consumption of human flesh.
See: kuru

cannibalism

The act or practice of eating the flesh of members of the same species.

cannibalism

the eating of flesh of living members of the same or similar species. It is common only in pigs and chickens and is due partly to boredom because of the confined space in which the animals are kept. See also infantophagia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The next step of the research was to inspect as to how the cannibalism sample would affect the alligator population in Orange Lake.
There is irony, too, in European Catholicism's repugnance toward cannibalism, since one of the church's sacred acts was a form of sacramental cannibalism in which believers ingested the symbolic body and blood of a messiah, thereby incorporating his qualities into their lives.
Our horror of cannibalism is so deeply instilled that we assume it is an aberration resulting from extreme conditions such as starvation.
Chapter 1, "Cannibal Love: Ideologies of Power, Gender, and the Erotics of Eating," examines cannibalism and sex in Maryse Conde's Histoire de la femme cannibale and Andrea Levy's Small Island in order to deepen our understanding of the relationship between the "mother country" and her colonies through the potential for hybridity.
Another drought in 1528 also caused widespread starvation, and reported cases of cannibalism.
Butchered human bones at a roughly 7,000-year-old farming village in Germany have also been interpreted as either remnants of cannibalism or ceremonial reburial (SN: 1/2/10, p.
amendments in Pakistan Penal Code proposing to enhance the imprisonment period for cannibalism from existing one year to seven years while an amount of Rs 500,000 as fine.
Despite the limits of Kehlmann's representation of Humboldt--who appears somewhat robotic and cold in the novel, as opposed to the spirited romantic that emerges in his own writing--this tension around the ideologically loaded image of cannibalism explodes in a scene where Humboldt proves willing to kill his reliable companion Bonpland over the claim that Humboldt himself may actually have consumed human flesh, having partaken of the roasted flesh of a monkey:
Cannibalism occurs in many different ecological and social contexts, and is present during any or all life stages from just after hatching and throughout development or mating (Fox 1975; Elgar & Crespi 1992).
After the girl agreed to help him carry out his cannibalism fantasy, he wrote: "Great, I can meet you at Ashford International train station and take you home to kill you.
cornuta showed better results during the first 10 days whereas less growth and more cannibalism was seen in the last 10 days of the experimental period.