cane

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cane

 [kān]
an assistive device that provides partial support and balance for ambulation and standing.
 Cane. A and B, adjustable canes. C, quadripod (quad) cane.
adjustable cane a cane whose length can be easily altered.
quadripod cane a cane adapted for increased stability by providing a four-legged rectangular base of support.
tripod cane one similar to a quadripod cane except that its base is triangular with three legs.
white cane a cane used by the visually handicapped to increase awareness of the immediate environment; the white color is a sign to others that the user is blind.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cane

(kān)
n.
A stick used as an aid in walking or carried as an accessory.

can′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cane

(kān)
An assistive device prescribed to provide support during ambulation and transfers for individuals with weakness, instability, pain, or balance loss. It also may be used to unload a lower extremity joint or to partially eliminate weight-bearing. Standard (conventional) canes are made from wood or aluminum and have a variety of hand grip styles. Other styles include tripod canes, quadruped (quad) canes, and walk (“hemi”) canes. Canes should be used on the unaffected (stronger) side of the body.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The teacher is seen defending himself, saying the girl only apologised after the caning and after a friend urged her to do so.
He said when adolescents are subjected to caning, they tend to turn rebellious.
Education CS Amina Mohamed in a press conference last week opposed calls to reintroduce caning in schools.
class="MsoNormalThe uncontroverted expert opinion, based on numerous studies, is that firstly, caning and other forms of physical violence are not useful in improving behaviour.
London-based human rights watchdog Amnesty International on Wednesday urged Malaysia to end a caning "epidemic", saying the women's case was "just the tip of the iceberg".
Four men who have received caning sentences by the Syariah Court are appealing their sentences," he said.