canine parvovirus


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Related to canine parvovirus: canine distemper

canine parvovirus

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An improved haemagglutination test for study of canine parvovirus. Vet.
([dagger]) Ingezim (1.6-27.8) ([dagger]) Leishmania (#) Toxoplasma MAT, 1:25 23 73.9 gondii (3) (52.2-88.0) Neospora c-ELISA, 23 30.4 caninum 30% (3) (14.5-52.2) * ref, reference; FAVN, fluorescent antibody virus neutralization; CPV, canine parvovirus; c-ELISA, competitive ELISA; CDV, canine distemper virus; MAT, modified agglutination test.
If the animal is a non-responder to a highly pathogenic agent, like canine parvovirus or feline panleukopenia virus, the infected animal will die if infected.
Haematobiochemical and therapeutic studies of canine parvovirus infection.
Canine parvovirus (a highly contagious virus that can cause severe vomiting and bloody diarrhea; most often seen in puppies between six weeks and six months of age, it is expensive to treat and fatal without treatment), canine distemper virus (a severe, airborne virus that can cause permanent brain damage, vomiting and diarrhea), canine adenovirus (also called infectious hepatitis, it causes vomiting, diarrhea, severe liver damage and death), and rabies (a virus that causes changes in temperament, inability to swallow, convulsions and death and is transmissible to other animals and humans) are considered core vaccines for dogs.
Canine Parvovirus affects all breeds of domesticated dog and foxes.
Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) is responsible for severe and highly contagious gastroenteric diseases in pups.
Detection of canine norovirus, parvovirus, and coronavirus in 105 fecal samples from dogs with and without diarrhea, Porto, Viseu, and Guarda, Portugal, December 2007-November 2008 * Canine parvovirus Canine Canine norovirus, 2, ([double coronavirus, ([dagger]) no.
Canine parvovirus (a highly contagious virus that can cause severe vomiting and bloody diarrhea; most often seen in puppies between six weeks and six months of age, it is expensive to treat and fatal without treatment); canine distemper virus (a severe, airborne virus that can cause permanent brain damage, vomiting and diarrhea); canine adenovirus (also called infectious hepatitis, it causes vomiting, diarrhea, severe liver damage and death); and rabies (a virus that causes changes in temperament, inability to swallow, convulsions and death and is transmissible to other animals and humans) are considered core vaccines for dogs.
Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection is characterized by haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in older and myocarditis in young dogs.
Canine coronavirus-associated puppy mortality without evidence of concurrent canine parvovirus infection.

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