CANDLE

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can·de·la (cd),

(kan'de-lă),
The SI unit of luminous intensity, 1 lumen per m2; the luminous intensity, in a given direction, of a source that emits monochromatic radiation of frequency 540 × 1012 Hz and that has a radiant intensity in that direction of 1/683 W per steradian (solid angle).
Synonym(s): candle
[L.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Candesartan vs. Losartan Efficacy Study. A trial comparing the antihypertensive effect of candesartan cilexetil—Atacand®—with losartan— Cozaar®
Conclusion Atacand®, an angiotensin receptor blocker, provided a significantly greater reduction in diastolic blood pressure than Cozaar®
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

CANDLE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Candesartan versus Losartan Efficacy Comparison–to compare the antihypertensive effect of candesartan cilexetil–Atacand® with losartan. See Candesartan cilexetil.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I also wish to thank the Joseph Conrad Estate (through the agency of Cambridge University Press and Professor Laurence Davies) and the Trustees of the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York, for their respective permission to quote from the eight letters from Joseph Conrad to Edmund Candler, the originals of which are held by the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York (Accession No.
"Edmund Candler (1874-1926): An Imperialist Writer." Unpublished M.A.
(4) The letters are described in the Library's accession document as: "Autograph letters signed (4) and typed letters signed (4): Orlestone and Bishopsbourne, Kent, and Spring Grove, Wye, to Candler." Dept.
Stephen Brodsky has pointed out that internal evidence points to 1923, and Henry Candler prints it as 1923.
Candler's Open Letter," from Young India, 26 May 1920).
(18) See Henry Candler (ix), and Youth and the East (160).
(20) Henry Candler (xiii) says this was for five weeks, and was a post which Candler found "quite incompatible with his literary instincts." And see Youth and the East (195-209).