cancer risk

cancer risk

The likelihood of developing malignancy, which is the combined result of lifestyle (e.g., low-fibre diet, smoking, chronic alcohol abuse, exposure to carcinogens) and genetics (e.g., family history of cancer).

cancer risk

The likelihood of developing malignancy, the combined results of lifestyle–eg, low fiber diet, smoking, chronic alcohol abuse, exposure to carcinogens, and family Hx of cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
Among women, the strongest significant associations between each 5 kg/[m.sup.2] increase in BMI and an increased cancer risk were seen in cases of endometrial cancer, gallbladder cancer, esophageal carcinoma, and renal cancer, with risk ratios of 1.59, 1.59, 1.51, and 1.34, respectively.
Taking antioxidant supplements won't reduce cancer risk, according to a new analysis of a dozen studies including more than 100,000 patients.
Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers, located in Evergreen Park, Illinois, in the US has developed a new web site to help women learn about breast cancer and evaluate their breast cancer risk.
1 issue of Cancer, found that those with lower levels of education were more likely to believe false statements about cancer risk. Two misconceptions about smoking that were endorsed by about 15 percent of survey respondents were that there is little reduction in cancer risk when long-term smokers quit and that low-tar cigarettes are less dangerous than regular cigarettes.
(2) The Michels article expressed the hope that "an incomplete pregnancy of short duration might impart the benefits of a full-term pregnancy and thus reduce breast cancer risk."' Although medical researchers all hope that this is true, the best evidence points in the opposite direction.
A new study quantifies a downside to these rapid and relatively noninvasive scans: Their X rays can substantially increase an individual's cancer risk. Younger patients, especially women, incur the greatest increases.
Women with a BRCA1/2 mutation have a lifetime breast cancer risk of 50% to 85% and a lifetime ovarian cancer risk of 14% to 40%.
It is these synthetic progesterones that appear to be the biggest culprits in increasing breast cancer risk.
Two books published in the past year by the Oncology Nursing Society may be of interest to nurses who need resources related to cancer prevention and control, cancer risk assessment, cancer genetics, or nursing education related to these topics.
Unfortunately, nearly all classrooms have levels--like many indoor environments today--that may cause long-term irritation and contribute to cancer risk.
Data from the 12 studies that assessed cervical cancer risk among HPV-positive women suggest that the relative risk rose with longer periods of use, but it was significantly elevated for long-term users only (2.5).
"CPSC estimated the increased cancer risk to range from two cases in every million people to 100 in a million.

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