Campylobacter

(redirected from campylobacters)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

Campylobacter

 [kam´pĭ-lo-bak″ter]
a genus of gram-negative, microaerophilic to anaerobic, motile, curved or spiral rod-shaped bacteria, found in the oral cavity, intestinal tract, and reproductive organs of humans and animals. Certain subspecies of C. fe´tus are agents of acute gastroenteritis and can cause systemic infection in immunocompromised persons. C. pylo´ri is now known as Helicobacter pylori.

Campylobacter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'ter),
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonsporeforming, spiral or S-curved rods with a single flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; cells may also become spheric under adverse conditions; they are motile with a corkscrewlike motion and nonsaccharolytic. The type species is Campylobacter fetus.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Campylobacter

/Cam·py·lo·bac·ter/ (kam´pĭ-lo-bak´ter) a genus of bacteria, family Spirillaceae, made up of gram-negative, non–spore-forming, motile, spirally curved rods, which are microaerophilic to anaerobic. C. jeju´ni, C. co´li, and certain subspecies of C. fe´tus can cause gastroenteritis; C. rec´tus is associated with periodontal disease..

Campylobacter

Etymology: Gk, campylos, curved, bakterion, small staff
a genus of bacteria found in the family Spirillaceae. The organisms consist of gram-negative, nonspore-forming, spirally curved motile rods that have a single polar flagellum at either or both ends of the cell. They move in a characteristic coillike motion. The organisms are microaerophiles, requiring little or no oxygen for growth. The type species is C. fetus, which consists of several subspecies that cause human infections, as well as abortion and infertility in cattle. Also called Vibrio fetus.
enlarge picture
Campylobacter

Campylobacter

A genus of gently-curved gram-negative rods that are common zoonotic commensals found in the GI tracts of wild and domesticated animals, and cause 3 types of human disease: enteric–eg, diarrhea, typically by C jejuni, extraintestinal, most often by C fetus, and gastric, due to C pylori, re-classified as Helicobacter pylori; human infections are attributed to contaminated water or food. See Helicobacter pylori.

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, curved spiral rods with a single polar flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; they are motile with a characteristic corkscrewlike motion.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]
Campylobacter a genus of Gram-negative, flagellate bacteria that cause gut infections; a rare trigger of Guillaine-Barré syndrome

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonspore-forming, spiral or S-curved rods.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Campylobacter

a genus of bacteria, family Spirillaceae, made up of gram-negative, non-spore-forming, motile, comma-shaped rods, which are microaerophilic to anaerobic. Members of the genus were previously classified as Vibrio spp. and many of the diseases caused by these species are still referred to as vibriosis.

Campylobacter coli
a commensal of the gastrointestinal tract of poulty, pigs and humans; can cause enteritis in pigs and humans.
Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus
causes ovine genital campylobacteriosis and abortion in sheep and cattle.
Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis
causes bovine vibriosis, also known as epizootic bovine infertility.
Campylobacter hyointestinalis, Campylobacter mucosalis
associated with the porcine intestinal adenomatosis complex, proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy, necrotic enteritis.
Campylobacter jejuni
causes abortion in sheep and enteritis in dogs, cats and other animals. An important food-borne cause of enteritis in humans, and the cause of avian vibrionic hepatitis.
Campylobacter sputorum subsp. bubulus, Campylobacter sputorum biovar fecalis
found in cattle and sheep, but not known to cause disease.
Campylobacter upsaliensis
may be associated with diarrhea in dogs and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bu calismada, Istanbul'da satisa sunulan pilic eti orneklerinde gida hijyeni acisindan buyuk onem tasiyan termotolerant Campylobacter spp.
Istanbul piyasasinda buyuk marketlerde satisa sunulan 176 pilic eti (56 adet butun pilic, 27 paket pilic gogsu, 33 paket kalcali but, 25 paket pilic baget ve 35 paket pilic kanadi) numunesinin ornek olarak alindigi calismamizda termotolerant Campylobacter spp.
Foods implicated as Campylobacter vehicles include poultry, red meat, milk, and water (7-11).
Campylobacter enteritis cases are usually self-limiting, but treatment with antibiotics may be required e.
Mas del 90% de las infecciones por este genero corresponden a Campylobacter jejuni y entre 5 a 10% a Campylobacter coli (Adedayo y Kirkpatrick, 2008).
Dallas, GA) equipped with copper jacketed graphite electrodes was applied to scalder and chiller waters to minimize the number of Campylobacter spp.
OBJECTIVES: Our primary objective was to follow temporal changes in the prevalence of fluoroquinoloneresistant Campylobacter among poultry products from two conventional producers who announced their cessation of fluoroquinolone use in 2002 (3 years before the FDA's ban).
Furthermore, because this method is widely used for other campylobacters, it was important to develop it further, so that it may be used successfully with this group of organisms.
So far, no laboratory has yet developed a best method or "gold standard" to isolate and identify Campylobacters.
The seasonal variation of thermophilic campylobacters in beef cattle, dairy cattle and calves.
There are reports on the prevalence of Campylobacter among live birds and animals and different kinds of food from all over the world revealing upon a wide range of results.
Her research interests include Campylobacter epidemiology, infectious disease surveillance, and geospatial analysis.