campylobacter enteritis


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campylobacter enteritis

Infectious disease A water-borne gastroenteritis caused by C jejuni, a cause of travelers' diarrhea Epidemiology Linked to ingestion of contaminated eggs, poultry, water; 2-4 day incubation period Clinical Abdominal pain, ± bloody, watery diarrhea, fever. See Campylobacter jejuni.

campylobacter enteritis

A common type of food poisoning, caused by the organism Campylobacter jejuni . Sources of infection include water, raw milk, poultry and dogs.
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Bell's palsy presenting after a case of campylobacter enteritis. Aviat Space Environ Med 2013;84(5):525-7.
Campylobacter enteritis associated with foodborne transmission.
Bacterial food-borne diseases shared by man and animals include Campylobacter enteritis, E.
The Application of Weight to the Factor Responses Society Military Treatment Treatment Resource Status Cost Use Weight Must Total To One = 0.143 0.143 0.143 2 AIDS/HIV 9 9 9 3 Amebic Dysentery 9 3 3 4 Anthrax, cutaneous 9 3 3 5 Ascariasis 1 1 1 6 Brucellosis 9 3 1 7 Campylobacter Enteritis 9 1 1 Human Cost Geography Frequency Weight Must Total To One = 0.143 0.143 0.143 2 AIDS/HIV 9 9 1 3 Amebic Dysentery 1 9 1 4 Anthrax, cutaneous 1 9 1 5 Ascariasis 1 9 1 6 Brucellosis 3 9 1 7 Campylobacter Enteritis 1 9 9 FACTOR PVNTMED POINTS RANK Weight Must Total To One = 0.143 1 2 AIDS/HIV 3 7 2 3 Amebic Dysentery 3 4.143 31 4 Anthrax, cutaneous 1 3.857 40 5 Ascariasis 1 2.143 68 6 Brucellosis 1 3.857 40 7 Campylobacter Enteritis 9 5.571 17 Table 3.
Epidemiologic and laboratory investigation of an outbreak of Campylobacter enteritis associated with raw milk.
In August-September 1990, an outbreak of Campylobacter enteritis occurred at a camp near Christchurch, New Zealand.
Macrolides and fluoroquinolones generally are the first- and second-line choices, respectively, of antimicrobial drugs for treating Campylobacter enteritis. Since the late 1980s, resistance to these drugs has complicated treatment.
An outbreak of Campylobacter enteritis among staff of a poultry abattoir in Sweden.
Analysis of hospitalized cases was based on patients with a principal diagnosis code for Campylobacter enteritis (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, code 008.43, or International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, code A04.5).
Numerous studies implicate chicken consumption as an important risk factor for Campylobacter enteritis (6-18).
We have presented new estimates of the absolute and relative risk for well-described complications such as HUS after EHEC infection, GBS after an episode of Campylobacter enteritis, and reactive arthritis after Yersinia enteritis.