camphor


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Related to camphor: menthol, camphor poisoning

camphor

 [kam´fer]
a ketone derived from an Asian tree, Cinnamomum camphora, or produced synthetically; used topically for relief of itching and inhaled as a nasal decongestant.

cam·phor

(kam'fōr),
A ketone distilled from the bark and wood of Cinnamonum camphora, an evergreen tree of Taiwan and Southeast Asia and nearby islands, and also prepared synthetically from oil of turpentine; used in sundry commercial products and as a topical antiinfective and antipruritic agent.
[mediev. L., fr. Ar. kāfure]

camphor

/cam·phor/ (kam´fer) a ketone derived from the Asian tree Cinnamomum camphora or produced synthetically; used topically as an antipruritic and antiinfective and inhaled as a nasal decongestant; also used in folk medicine and in Indian medicine.

camphor

(kăm′fər)
n.
A fragrant white or colorless crystalline ketone, C10H16O, obtained naturally from the wood of the camphor tree or synthesized from pinene and used as an insect repellent, in the manufacture of film, plastics, lacquers, and in medicine chiefly in external preparations to relieve mild pain and itching.

cam′phor·a′ceous (kăm′fə-rā′shəs) adj.
cam·phor′ic (-fôr′ĭk) adj.

camphor

[kam′fər]
Etymology: L, camphora
a colorless or white crystalline substance with a penetrating odor and pungent taste, occurring naturally in certain plants, especially Cinnamomum camphora. Also called camphora, gum camphor.

camphor

A bicyclic alcoholic or ketonic terpene obtained from Cinnamomum camphora as whitish crystals; camphor is used topically as an analgesic, antipruritic, rubifacient, as a counterirritant for inflamed joints and a mouthwash; internally it is a carminative, decongestant and expectorant.

Toxicity
Prolonged exposure to camphor’s volatile oils may cause nausea, vomiting, delirium, coma and respiratory arrest.

cam·phor

(kamfŏr)
A ketone distilled from the bark and wood of Cinnamonum camphora, an evergreen tree of Taiwan and Southeast Asia and nearby islands, and also prepared synthetically from oil of turpentine; used in sundry commercial products and as a topical antiinfective and antipruritic agent.

cam·phor

(kamfŏr)
A ketone distilled from the bark and wood of Cinnamonum camphora; used as a topical antiinfective and antipruritic.

camphor

a ketone derived from the cinnamon tree, Cinnamomum camphora, or produced synthetically; used externally as an antiphlogistic and antiseptic; applied in liniments as a counterirritant; administered as a steam inhalant as an expectorant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The free radical-scavenging activities of the essential oil (EOOK), camphor, a mixture of Limonene: 1,8 cineole and of the positive control, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), were determined using the DPPH free radical method (Blois, 1958).
The fruit flies' reduced distaste for camphor occurred through a mechanism that involves the degradation of the TRPL protein by an enzyme called E3 ubiquitin ligase, or Ube3a, which targets specific protein substrates for degradation.
Cinnamon, white camphor, wintergreen and mixture of white camphor and Wintergreen significantly produced more malformations (df=6, F=2.
They had either eaten camphor products, inhaled camphor or had it rubbed on them as a cold remedy.
Huott et al found that only 22% of the adolescents surveyed possessed knowledge of the lethal potential of over-the-counter products containing camphor.
1 -- color) One of the guest rooms at the Britt Scripps Inn is in the Carriage House, shaded by a 141-year-old camphor tree.
These compounds include eugenol, camphor, caryophyllene, ursolic acid, rosmarinic acid, luteolin, and apigenin.
Clemson University scientists studied the inhibitory effect of two kinds of feverfew extracts and their major components, including parthenolide, luteolin and camphor, on the growth of L.
Used infrequently today, and only by prescription, the mixture contains about one percent morphine, with other ingredients including benzoic acid, camphor and anise oil.
The fine mesh of young camphor leaves possesses the powdery texture of a gouache drawing, and the splash of the waterfall against a rock is depicted as a white gap with knife-blade glitter.
The leading brands of fabric softeners contain dangerous chemicals such as chloroform, camphor, and limonene, all of which are on the Environmental Protection Agency's hazardous waste list.