camouflage

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camouflage

a disguise resulting from an organism having similar coloration to the background, or markings which cause breaking of the outline (DISRUPTIVE COLORATION), so that the organism blends into the background and is hidden from predators. See CRYPTIC COLORATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2016 when Land Rover was testing its Range Rover Evoque Convertible, camouflaged prototypes featured a partying man motif.
Still, the soil column at Geller's (2015) field site is sand, which inherently is easily camouflaged due to its fine texture.
"All of a sudden down the street came some big cannon, the first any of us had seen painted, that is, camouflaged. Pablo stopped, he was spell-bound.
Previous studies have shown that certain background variables-such as brightness, contrast, edge and size of objects, etc.-are essential for eliciting camouflaged body patterns.
Many birds have coloring that allows them to be disguised and camouflaged, such as the snowy owl blending in with snow.
Some bugs are camouflaged by disguise--they resemble their surroundings.
I've been trying to think of an animal that can be legally hunted with a rimfire .22 and is sharp-eyed enough to call for a camouflaged rifle.
A Freedom of Information Act request to determine if Crown had filed with the FAA was not responded to before deadline, but if a monopole or tower is deemed an aviation hazard, it would have to be marked with the flashing red beacon and painted aviation orange and white - very different from the camouflaged poles shown off by the cell industry.
is working on in its supersecret facility camouflaged as a very tall hedge.
To determine if the strong preference for decorating with Dictyota menstrualis decreased predation on crabs, we compared field predation rates on crabs camouflaged with this preferred decoration species vs.
Ironically, the camouflaged characters sometimes turned into unintentional expressions of gay rage.
Camouflaged clothing introduced during the 1950s, '60s and even the early 1970s generally relied on patterns that weren't all that different than the military patterns of WWII.