cambium layer

cam·bi·um lay·er

1. the inner osteogenic layer of the periosteum;
2. a highly cellular zone immediately beneath the epithelium covering a botryoid sarcoma.

cambium layer

Etymology: L, cambire, to exchange
1 the loose inner cellular layer of the periosteum that develops during ossification.
2 a cellular layer of formative tissue that lies between the wood and the bark in plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The stroma is loosely cellular with a myxoid appearance including a hypocellular zone that separates the surface epithelium from the underlying cambium layer.
In trees such as maples and oaks, cells grow and multiply in the cambium layer, just below the bark, increasing the diameter of the tree.
4,5,6) The pedicled periosteum comprises of two layers, an inner cellular or cambium layer and an outer fibrous layer.
demonstrated that maintaining the periosteal layer of mucoperiosteum preserves highly osteogenic cambium layer.
Immediately beneath the outer skin or bark of every plant there is a layer of cells called the cambium layer.
Make an angled cut to expose the cambium layer just beneath the bark.
One answer is ring barking, the removal in winter of a half inch wide strip of wood encircling the trunk taking care not to cut into the cambium layer.
In the first phase of this research, the authors successfully demonstrated that ESWT increased the thickness of the cambium layer surrounding bone and the number of cambium cells within that layer.
And it takes the bark right off of a tree to the cambium layer.
She started working with the cambium layer of big leaf maples she found near her home, shaping her baskets in response to her forest environment.
Tight bark helps protect the growing mycelium, whereas if you use a log cut after sap has begun moving in the cambium layer, the bark may slough off, leaving the mycelium exposed.