calvarium


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Related to calvarium: diploic vein, Oxyphil cells

cal·var·i·um

(kal-vār'ē-ŭm),
Incorrectly used for calvaria.

calvarium

(kăl-vâr′ē-əm)
n. pl. calvar·iums or calvar·ia (-ē-ə)
The upper domelike portion of the skull without the lower jaw or the lower jaw and the facial parts.

cal·var·i·um

(kal-var'ē-ŭm)
USAGE NOTE Incorrectly used term for calvaria.

calvarium

The vault of the skull. The skull less the jaw and facial bones.

calvaria, calvarium

the domelike superior portion of the cranium, comprising the superior portions of the frontal, parietal and occipital bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twelve cases have been reported before and none presented with thoracic skeleton deformities or cystic changes in the calvarium.
Figure 1: (a) Sagittal view fetal MRI demonstrating the absence of the calvarium with large mass of brain tissues hanging outside of the skull base and an incomplete layer of vascular epithelium covering the deformed brain.
The calvarium of each animal was removed, fixed in 4% paraformoldehyde for 48h, and then sent for direct digital radiographic exam.
2) These lesions can arise from the calvarium, dura, and base of the skull and may appear as benign lesions.
This method of removing the brain within its bony coverings is an adaptation of that described by Laurence and Martin (11) in 1959 whereby the posterior scalp is reflected from the calvarium as far as the ramus of the mandibles, the attachments of the pinnae are severed, and temporomandibular joints are disarticulated.
2003), "Homo Erectus Calvarium from the Pleistocene of Java," Science 299: 1384-1388.
Aerosols should be minimized by using a handsaw rather than an oscillating saw, and by avoiding contact of the saw blade with brain tissue while removing the calvarium.
The scalp injury resulting from the electrical current is associated with necrosis of the outer table of the calvarium (class III) or the outer and inner tables of the cranial bone (class IV) as well as destruction of the overlying soft tissue (Table 1).
A subsequent skeletal survey showed a diffuse salt and pepper pattern affecting most of the osseous structures, with additional lytic lesions in the calvarium and extremities.
Finally, he arrived at Varanasi, where the calvarium or skull-cup (kapala), which had stuck firmly to his hand, fell off at last.