callosity


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callus

 [kal´us]
1. localized hyperplasia of the horny layer of the epidermis due to pressure or friction.
2. an unorganized network of woven bone formed about the ends of a broken bone; it is absorbed as repair is completed (provisional callus), and ultimately replaced by true bone (definitive callus).
A fracture with callus formation (arrow) is demonstrated corresponding to the base of the second metatarsal. From Thrall and Ziessman, 2001.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cal·los·i·ty

(ka-los'i-tē),
A circumscribed thickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1)
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

callosity

(kə-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. callosi·ties
1. The condition of being calloused. Also called tylosis.
2. Hardheartedness; insensitivity.
3. See callus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

callosity

A bony bump
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

callosity

A bony bump, callus
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cal·los·i·ty

(kă-los'i-tē)
A circumscribedthickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1) , tyloma.
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

callosity

A protective response of the skin to excessive or prolonged friction or pressure, especially over a bony prominence. A common example is the corn on a toe caused by ill-fitting footwear or by an abnormally positioned toe.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Photographs of callosity patterns and other distinctive body scars allow us to recognize individuals.
[I]f that dreary Greenland-wind of benighted Want, perennial from sire to son, had frozen him into a kind of torpor and numb callosity, so that he saw not, felt not, - was this, for a creature with a soul in it, some assuagement; or the cruelest wretchedness of all?
Once Khomeini told a group of visitors, "The callosity on the peasant's palm is the real deed of the land." The advocates of land reform interpreted this remark as a fatva, or religious judgment, and concluded that those who work on the land are its legitimate owners.
The foot must be functional, pain free, plantigrade with good mobility without callosity and does not require to wear modified shoes.